Posts Tagged ‘lewis carroll



02
May
11

Illustrated by Willy Pogany

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll: illustrated by Willy Pogany.

Published by Dover (26 Jun 2009)

ISBN-10: 0486470482

ISBN-13: 978-0486470481

Modern paperback reproduction of the book published by E.P.Dutton and Co in 1929. Black and white pictures only.

William Andrew (“Willy”) Pogany was born Vilmos Andreas Pogány in 1882 in Szeged, Hungary. After studying in Budapest, Munich and Paris he spent time in London before going to the States. He remained there until his death on 30 July 1955.

As well as work as an illustrator for books and advertisements, he was art director for several Hollywood films.

From the back cover:

Generations of children have fallen down the rabbit hole with the little girl in the pinafore, to return again and again to Wonderland. Translated into more than one hundred languages, this captivating fantasy has enchanted readers of all ages around the world. This new edition of Alice’s adventures offers a fresh look at the time-honored tale, featuring an abundance of exuberant illustrations in the elegant style of Art Nouveau.
Willy Pogány, a prolific Hungarian-born artist best known for his illustrations of classic myths and legends, created these striking drawings in 1929. Pogány’s intricate black-and-white images retain the story’s playful spirit while injecting a zesty modern air to depictions of the White Rabbit, the Queen of Hearts, the Mad Hatter, and other fantastical characters. This restoration of Pogány’s long out-of-print illustrations offers a fine introduction to a classic tale, as well as splendid addition to the collections of those already acquainted with Alice’s adventures.

Available on Amazon: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

30
Apr
11

Classics Illustrated

Classics Illustrated: Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll.

Art by Alex A. Blum. New cover art by Cristina Choma. Digital recolouring and text by Shane Kirshenblatt.

(Re-)Published in July 2010 by Classic Comic Store. All artwork re-coloured and the cover digitally enhanced.

ISBN: 9781906814489

The Classics Illustrated series of comics have a complicated history that spans both sides of the Atlantic. If you want details there’s both a Wiki page and a history on the CI webpage.

Alex Blum- actually Alexander Anthony Blum (1889–1969) was born in Hungary, and studied at the National Academy of Design in New York.

He illustrated twenty-five of the Classics Illustrated titles as well as ‘Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs’, the debut issue of Classics Illustrated Junior.

Available on Amazon: Alice in Wonderland (Classics Illustrated)

13
Mar
11

Illustrated by Justin Todd

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll.

Illustrated by Justin Todd.

Published by Gollancz, 1984. First edition hardback with dustjacket.

The dustjacket has a photograph on the back of Alice Liddell as “The Beggar Maid”, taken by Lewis Carroll.

Artist Justin Todd  was runner-up for the Francis Williams memorial prize for children’s book illustrations in 1987 with this book. He studied painting at Wimbledon and illustration at The Royal College.

As you can see from the scan, this cost me £5.95…

Available on amazon: Justin Todd

13
Mar
11

Illustrated by D.R. Sexton

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll.

Illustrated by D.R. Sexton.

Published by Juvenile Productions Ltd as part of the ‘Merlin Series for boys and girls‘, which were a selection of popular children’s classics in a budget format.

Hardback book with dust-jacket, a colour frontispiece and 18 full-page line illustrations.

Undated.

Once again I’m defeated: I can’t find anything out about D.R. Sexton. Bother.

Available on amazon: Alice in Wonderland, [The Merlin Series]

13
Mar
11

Illustrated by Gordon Robinson

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll.

Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.

Published by Charles H. Kelly, London in 1916. Hardback, no dustjacket, but rather a pretty cover- art nouveau/arts and craft-ish.

I have been unsuccessful in finding anything at all out about the artist responsible for the illustraions. If anyone could help, I’d be grateful.

13
Mar
11

Egyptian Alice

Egyptian Alice: adapted and abridged from the Lewis Carroll original.

I can’t give much info on this one, as it’s all in arabic, apart from the date 2010 and a number: 0106372799- which unfortunately doesn’t seem to be an ISBN number.

The book was a present from Egypt via my friend Debbie- thanks Debs!

It’s a 16 page softback picture book, and judging by the illustrations includes several of the familiar episodes- the hall of doors, the pool of tears, the caterpillar, and the duchess’ footmen, but omits the Cheshire cat, the mad tea party, the White Rabbit’s house and the court scenes. The book seems to end with Alice talking to the Mock Turtle- no sign of the Gryphon. I’d love a translation.

13
Mar
11

Wasp in a Wig: Telegraph Magazine

Wasp in a Wig: Telegraph Magazine: by Lewis Carroll, published September 4th 1977

‘The Wasp in a Wig’ was first published in the UK in this 1977 Sunday Telegraph colour supp, along with illustrations by Ralph Steadman. Inside the magazine there are further illustrations by Hugh Casson, Patrick Proctor and Peter Blake.

From the Christie’s Cataolgue, April 2005:

While Dodgson was in the final stages of preparing Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, his sequel to Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, he made a sudden revision by dropping a large episode where Alice comes across an old wasp wearing a wig. It was at the proofing stage while the book was in galley sheets when Dodgson made the decision to drop the episode with several strokes of his characteristic purple ink.

“The meeting with the Wasp echoes Alice’s encounter with the White Knight. It too dwells on the subject of age and aging, the Wasp also serving as a mouthpiece for Charles’s thoughts and feelings, disguised here, not by armor, but by a wig” (Cohen, Lewis Carroll, p. 216). The first of the Wasp’s five-stanza explanation of how he came to wear the wig reads: “When I was young, my ringlets waved And Curled and crinkled on my head: And then they said ‘You should be shaved, And wear a yellow wig instead.’” The interaction between the two shows a rare side of the ordinarily impatient Alice. In his introduction to the first published edition (1977) of The Wasp in a Wig, Martin Gardner explains the significance of the episode: “There is no episode in the book [Through the Looking-Glass] in which she treats a disagreeable creature with such remarkable patience. In no other episode, in either book, does her character come through so vividly as that of an intelligent, polite, considerate little girl. It is an episode in which extreme youth confronts extreme age. Although the Wasp is constantly critical of Alice, not once does she cease to sympathize with him.”

Prior to 1974, the only reference to this missing portion among Carroll literature is found in Stuart Dodgson Collingwood’s biography of his uncle, where he states that Through the Looking-Glass originally contained thirteen chapters, instead of the published twelve, the omitted chapter being the Wasp in the Wig episode. Scholars have questioned whether it really comprised a chapter or was rather an episode. More significantly, with the context these proofs provide, they now agree on its intended placement–just following the White Night chapter. Prior to the discovery of these proofs it was believed the Wasp episode appeared much earlier in Through the Looking-Glass: adjacent to the railway carriage scene.

What prompted Carroll to omit this episode is explained in a letter from the book’s illustrator, John Tenniel, to the author while illustrating Through the Looking-Glass. He was not happy with the subject and wrote Carroll on June 1, 1870, that “a wasp in a wig is altogether beyond the appliances of art” and that if you want to shorten the book there is your opportunity.” Tenniel had exerted his opinions on other occasions with Carroll before: it was Tenniel, not Carroll, who insisted the first edition (1865) of Alice be scrapped due to the poor printing of the illustrations (the surviving copies remain one of the greatest rarities in English literature).

When they came to light at auction in 1974, after missing for over a century, the “discovery” of the present set of proof sent shock waves throughout the world of Carroll scholars and admirers alike. After fruitless attempts of finding any trace of the suppressed material, the draft was presumed lost, and some Carroll scholars even doubted it ever had ever existed. In 1977, the episode was published, with Mr. Armour’s generous permission, by the Lewis Carroll Society of America. The publication prompted an enormous amount of attention, and numerous articles surrounding the publication of the lost episode appeared in the U.K. and America press at the time, including the Smithsonian (December 1977), Time magazine (6 June 1977), and the Telegraph: Sunday Magazine (4 September 1977).

You can read the whole of the lost chapter here: http://www.alice-in-wonderland.net/alice4.html

This copy bought from Stella and Rose books for a tenner.

19
Jan
11

alice through the looking glass: 1872 edition

Alice Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll

50 illustrations by John Tenniel. Red hardcover with gilt trim and all page edges gilt. Published by Macmillan & Co. 1872. Twenty first thousand. (First edition but later printing). Publisher’s advertisements at the back.

It’s surprising how reasonably you can pick up early Looking Glass printings. There are several of these on abebooks for around the 25-30 quid mark. You wouldn’t get a Wonderland for that…

Having said that, this is very precious to me- it’s my oldest book and was given as an anonymous Christmas present. Although I have a shrewd idea who from…

20
Nov
10

Abelardo Morell

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, illustrated with photographs by Abelardo Morell.

Published 1998 by Dutton Children’s Books (Penguin Putnam Inc).

Hardback with dustjacket.

Abelardo Morrell was born in 1948 in Havana, but is now a professor of photography at the Massachusetts College of Art.

This Alice is illustrated with black and white photos of scenes set up by Morell which include cutouts of Tenniel’s illustrations with props and effects that complement the action. I’m surprised this isn’t better known: I think it’s rather lovely.

23
Jun
10

Alice in Wonderland Jigsaw Book

Alice in Wonderland Jigsaw Book: with seven 48-piece jigsaws- by Lewis Carroll.

With John Tenniel illustrations, coloured by Harry G. Theaker and Diz Wallis.

This edition published by Ted Smart, 2000, but first issued by Macmillan in 1999.

ISBN: 0333762916

From the publisher:

A gift book with some of the most famous illustrations in “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” and “Through the Looking-Glass” presented as seven 48-piece jigsaw puzzles. Each puzzle is accompanied by an extract abridged from Lewis Carroll’s books as well as some of his nonsense poems and songs.
All the jigsaws are complete: they haven’t even been removed from their pages. In fact the book looks ‘as new’ although I bought it in the British Heart Foundation shop. For £2.50, as you can see in the scan :)



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