Posts Tagged ‘lewis carroll

22
Jun
13

Illustrated by Franciszka Themerson

IMG_0406Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There: by Lewis Carroll, illustrated by Franciszka Themerson.

Published by Inky Parrot Press (2001).

Hard back with black boards decorated with white illustrations by Themerson.

With a forward by Jasia Reichardt, and afterword by (the now rather disgraced- found guilty of six charges of indecency with a child and one charge of indecent assault against a child) Graham Ovenden.

Themerson was commissioned in 1946 (not long before copyright was up) by Harrap to illustrate Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There. Even though the blocks had been made, Harrap decided not to go ahead with publication- possibly as with the loss of copyright, the market may have been flooded with new versions, but Inky Parrot rescued and published the rather fabulous illustrations in 2001.

Published in an edition of 372 Standard copies, casebound, signed and 48 Special copies, bound in quarter leather with 6 initialled prints in a folder, but mine is a proof copy with a dedication from  Ovenden.

IMG_0408

Available on Amazon.

31
Dec
11

Illustrated by Moritz Kennel

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll.

Illustrated by Moritz Kennel.

ISBN: 0690009844

Published by Crowell, New York, 1971. First US edition, and first in English. Hardback with dustjacket.

Kennel uses vibrant colours and strong shapes in the illustrations, giving them a real 70s look. Love ‘em. Shame I seem to be unable to find out anything about him…

 

31
Dec
11

The Philosopher’s Alice

The Philosopher’s Alice: Lewis Carroll with notes and introduction by Peter Heath. Subtitled The Thinking Man’s Guide to a Misunderstood Nursery Classic.

Tenniel illustrations

Published by Academy Editions, London, 1974. Hardcover. First Edition.

Peter Heath was a former president of the Lewis Carroll Society of North America, and Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the University of Virginia. The book is the original text (both books) with philosophical asides and comments: Heath himself says that the books show “surprising insights into abstract questions of philosophy”. Very interesting stuff: well worth a read.

On the “Raven/ Writing Desk’ riddle:

‘Shibles compares this to the unanswerable questions allegedly asked by Philosophers. But the real objection to it is that it has too many answers, namely all the innumerable negative properties that ravens share with writing desks (by which I suppose he means logical negatives like ‘neither of them have a chimney’). If these do not count then neither does the property of unanswerability which the Hatter’s riddle is supposed to share with the questions of Philosophers.’

On amazon: The Philosopher’s Alice: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass

28
Dec
11

Through the Looking-glass and What Alice Found There: Illustrated by John Vernon Lord

Through the Looking-glass and What Alice Found There: Illustrated by John Vernon Lord. Textual corrections and a foreword by Selwyn Goodacre.

Published by Artists Choice Editions; first edition (25 Oct 2011).

Available in two editions: a standard limited edition, with a run of 320 copies numbered and signed by Lord, and priced £98. The special limited edition, a run of 98 copies, bound with a leather spine and presented in a slipcase with a set of prints signed by Lord, is priced £320. Mine is the ‘cheap’ version…

From a Guardian article in 2007:

At first sight, his black and white illustrations, particularly those for Edward Lear, Lewis Carroll and Aesop, appear to be traditional wood engravings, but in fact they are all pen and ink drawings, which is something of a paradox. Wood engraving was invented so that drawings could be reproduced, but Lord has reversed the process and, instead of cutting into a surface to release the light, he skilfully builds up the dark areas with pen and ink. In his characteristically idiosyncratic manner, he meticulously records the time each illustration takes: in Aesop’s Fables, for instance, “The Bat, the Bramble and the Cormorant” took 16 hours, 32 minutes, while “The Crow and the Sheep” took 11 hours, 11 minutes. The variety in the textures (he uses a mapping pen and a Rotring) is astonishing: fine crosshatching emphasises form and volume, rather as a sheer black stocking does on a shapely ankle. Sometimes, with a thicker line, the glistening striations resemble the grooves on an old 78 record. In contrast to the free-hand drawing, certain areas are painstakingly created with parallel lines done with a ruler that’s had its hard edges rubbed down, so as to soften the line, while here and there he waxes the paper to resist the ink, creating sudden explosions of light in his atmospheric landscapes. His pen strokes are often dizzying in their intensity and while there’s little movement in the drawings – even the mad prancing figures he draws for Lear’s Nonsense Rhymes seem frozen in mid-air – around them the lines resonate with one another like singing telegraph wires. The composition is always precise and the drawing is very controlled, though occasionally he lets rip with a squiggle or two, as in “The Crow and the Sheep”. Humour is ever-present, but it’s a dark humour that lurks in corners and behind doors.

Just as lovely as the Wonderland.

Available via Amazon: Through the Looking-glass and What Alice Found There: Illustrated by John Vernon Lord

01
Nov
11

Illustrated by Jill Thompson and Jenny Frison

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll.

Illustrated by Jill Thompson and Jenny Frison.

Published by IDW Publishing, 2010. Hardback, ?1st edition?

Both Alice books in a single volume, with internal illustrations by Jenny Frison, and front cover art by Jill Thompson.

ISBN-13: 978-1600105968

From her bio:

Jill Thompson is the most well-known, female comicbook artist working in the comics industry today. She graduated in 1987 from the American Academy of Art in Chicago and has been working non-stop as a cartoonist and illustrator ever since. She has risen to the top of the male-dominated field and has garnered acclaim for her work on WONDER WOMAN, SWAMP THING, BLACK ORCHID and the award winning title SANDMAN with Neil Gaiman.

Jenny Frison is best known as a cover artist- they seem to have switched roles for this one. She has done covers for Angel and Spike comics. You can buy the artwork from this Alice (or just have a look) here.

I do prefer the internal illustrations to the cover art- they’re softer and less sharply cartoony. I didn’t buy this when I first saw it on Amazon, as I wasn’t attracted by the cover. It wasn’t until I found it in Dave’s Comics in Brighton that I got a look inside and bought it.

Still available on Amazon: Alices Adventures in Wonderland

24
Jul
11

Illustrated by Harry Rountree

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll: illustrated by Harry Rountree.

Published by Collins, date not known, but I think 1925. Small hardback book, no dustjacket.

Harry Rountree  came to London from New Zealand in 1901. He was 23 years old when he arrived, and he initially struggled. However, by the time he illustrated Alice (in 1908) he was a success. He re-visited Alice in 1925.

I bought this for a fiver as I like the Jabberwock who looks like a rabid guinea pig…

12
Jun
11

Aliciae Per Speculum Transitus

Aliciae Per Speculum Transitus (Quaeque Ibi Invenit), by Ludovici Carroll (Lewis Carroll).

Librum picturis ornavit Sir John Tenniel.

Translated by Clive Harcourt Carruthers.

Published by Macmillan, 1966 (same year as me). Hardback first edition with dustjacket.

I also own a latin Alice in Wonderland from the same translator: both of them are nice quality books, pleasant to hold and flick through, and it’s interesting trying to work out bits of the language (I did two years of Latin at school back in the 1980s, so don’t remember much…)

Available on Amazon: Aliciae per speculum transitus

29
May
11

Under the Quizzing Glass: A Lewis Carroll Miscellany

Under the Quizzing Glass: A Lewis Carroll Miscellany edited by R.B. Shaberman and Denis Crutch.

Published by The Magpie Press, 1972. Paperback.

The credit page says “Limited to 400 numbered copies (Nos. 1-25 being specially bound) of which this is No.”, and then there’s not a number but a hand drawn dash. What does that mean?

According to the frontispiece:

…containing original studies of his life and work together with some scarce Carrolliana now first reprinted and a poem never before published.

The best bit from my point of view is the “First Draft of an Annotated Handlist of Continuations and Imitations of Alice”.  I have a fair few of them already, but it gives me plenty more to track down!

Shaberman has written other books on Carroll, and apparently also on Nostradamus. Denis Crutch has written for the Lewis Carroll Society.

Bought on Amazon: Under the Quizzing Glass: Lewis Carroll Miscellany

23
May
11

Illustrated by Joe McLaren

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll: illustrated by Joe McLaren.

Published by Whites Books (Pocket Editions), 2010, hardcover book, embossed and with a black ribbon bookmark. First edition.

ISBN-13: 978-0956266828

Lovely little book, with wonderful illustrations, but it’s a shame that the band is glued to the inside front cover- I don’t want to remove it and damage the book, so I can’t scan in the whole cover…

Joe McLaren says on his website:

I was born in 1981, I live in Kent, I’m married, and I work as a freelance illustrator.

I graduated in 2003 from Brighton University (BA Hons Illustration First Class) and won a prize (University of Nagoya student show award~ first place).

I do lots of work for newspapers and magazines (most notably the Times and WIRED), and illustrate lots of book covers.

I can be contacted at joe_b_mclaren@hotmail.com

Available from Amazon: Alice in Wonderland (Pocket Classics)

21
May
11

Jack the Ripper: “Light Hearted Friend”

Jack the Ripper: “Light Hearted Friend” by Richard Wallace.

Published 1996 by Gemini Press. Softback.

ISBN: 0962719560

Provides ‘proof’ that Dodgson was Jack the Ripper. Funniest thing I’ve read in years: it’s genuinely dreadful.

According to the theory, hidden passages such as, ‘She wriggled about so! But at last Dodgson and Bayne found a way to keep hold of the fat little whore’ can be made by rearrangement of letters in the Alice and the Sylvie and Bruno texts. I suspect that you can make what you like given enough letters to choose from, a theory rather supported by Francis Heaney and Guy Jacobson who came up with an anagram of part of the book- here’s the original text:

This is my story of Jack the Ripper, the man behind Britain’s worst unsolved murders. It is a story that points to the unlikeliest of suspects: a man who wrote children’s stories. That man is Charles Dodgson, better known as Lewis Carroll, author of such beloved books as Alice in Wonderland.

And the anagram:

The truth is this: I, Richard Wallace, stabbed and killed a muted Nicole Brown in cold blood, severing her throat with my trusty shiv’s strokes. I set up Orenthal James Simpson, who is utterly innocent of this murder. P.S. I also wrote Shakespeare’s sonnets, and a lot of Francis Bacon’s works too.

Wiki link here.

The reviews on amazon are worth reading too. They’re right it only merits one star as a serious work, but it’s just so ridiculous that you can’t take it seriously…




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