Posts Tagged ‘Artists Choice Editions

22
Jun
13

Illustrating Alice

IMG_0405Illustrating Alice: An International Selection of Illustrated Editions of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass.

Published by Artists’ Choice Editions, 2013.

ISBN: 978-0-9558343-7-0

The book was issued in two versions: one standard hardback with dustjacket, limited to 600 copies, and one leather bound and including artists prints- limited to 68. Mine is the cheaper of the two…

From the publisher’s blurb:

Since 1907, when the copyright for Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland expired, there has been a world wide explosion of illustrated editions by artists who have been inspired to visualise Alice in their own fashion. There are at least three hundred illustrated English language editions and eighty from Japan. Carroll’s life and writings have been exhaustively documented but, curiously, very little has been written about the illustrated editions. The focus of Illustrating Alice is, in particular, the contemporary versions and these are discussed by experts and illustrators from nine countries. The book has a Foreword by Marina Vaizey, followed by illustrations and commentaries on the interpretation of Alice in different countries. Writers include Adriana Peliano – Brazil; Richard Newnhan – China; Selwyn Goodacre and Dennis Hall – England; Michèle Noret – France; Caterina Morelli – Italy; Prof. Mikiko Chimori – Japan; Prof. Monika Adamczyk-Garbowska – Poland; Ella Parry-Davies – Russia; Mark Burstein – United States and Canada. This is followed by reflections by artists who have illustrated Alice, with contributions by Barry Moser, De Loss McGraw and Gavin O’Keefe from the US; Ralph Steadman, John Vernon Lord, Helen Oxenbury, Emma Chichester Clark, Justin Todd, John Bradley and Michael Foreman from England; Chiara Carrer from Italy and Tatiana Ianovskaia from Russia. There is a chapter on Alice in film in which the Czech filmmaker Jan Švankmajer discusses his Alice film and Karen Lury, Prof. of Film and Television Studies, writes on Animating Alice: the heroine without a heart. Graham Ovenden writes an Afterword. An alphabetical checklist of all English language editions, compiled by Selwyn Goodacre and Edward Wakeling, is included.

This is an extremely dangerous thing for me to have bought- it opens a whole new world of books I have yet to buy, but it’s nice seeing old friends in there as well. There are loads of fantastic pictures, and articles by various illustrators (Barry Moser, Ralph Steadman, Helen Oxenbury, Jan Svankmajer). It’s printed on beautiful paper and really is a joy to handle.

Available on Amazon in both standard and special editions.

28
Dec
11

Through the Looking-glass and What Alice Found There: Illustrated by John Vernon Lord

Through the Looking-glass and What Alice Found There: Illustrated by John Vernon Lord. Textual corrections and a foreword by Selwyn Goodacre.

Published by Artists Choice Editions; first edition (25 Oct 2011).

Available in two editions: a standard limited edition, with a run of 320 copies numbered and signed by Lord, and priced £98. The special limited edition, a run of 98 copies, bound with a leather spine and presented in a slipcase with a set of prints signed by Lord, is priced £320. Mine is the ‘cheap’ version…

From a Guardian article in 2007:

At first sight, his black and white illustrations, particularly those for Edward Lear, Lewis Carroll and Aesop, appear to be traditional wood engravings, but in fact they are all pen and ink drawings, which is something of a paradox. Wood engraving was invented so that drawings could be reproduced, but Lord has reversed the process and, instead of cutting into a surface to release the light, he skilfully builds up the dark areas with pen and ink. In his characteristically idiosyncratic manner, he meticulously records the time each illustration takes: in Aesop’s Fables, for instance, “The Bat, the Bramble and the Cormorant” took 16 hours, 32 minutes, while “The Crow and the Sheep” took 11 hours, 11 minutes. The variety in the textures (he uses a mapping pen and a Rotring) is astonishing: fine crosshatching emphasises form and volume, rather as a sheer black stocking does on a shapely ankle. Sometimes, with a thicker line, the glistening striations resemble the grooves on an old 78 record. In contrast to the free-hand drawing, certain areas are painstakingly created with parallel lines done with a ruler that’s had its hard edges rubbed down, so as to soften the line, while here and there he waxes the paper to resist the ink, creating sudden explosions of light in his atmospheric landscapes. His pen strokes are often dizzying in their intensity and while there’s little movement in the drawings – even the mad prancing figures he draws for Lear’s Nonsense Rhymes seem frozen in mid-air – around them the lines resonate with one another like singing telegraph wires. The composition is always precise and the drawing is very controlled, though occasionally he lets rip with a squiggle or two, as in “The Crow and the Sheep”. Humour is ever-present, but it’s a dark humour that lurks in corners and behind doors.

Just as lovely as the Wonderland.

Available via Amazon: Through the Looking-glass and What Alice Found There: Illustrated by John Vernon Lord

20
Mar
10

Illustrated by John Vernon Lord

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland illustrated by John Vernon Lord.

Published by Artists Choice Editions, 2009. Hardback with illustrated boards. First edition, limited: signed by the artist, and numbered 89/348.

ISBN: 9780955834318

John Vernon Lord has said:

I tackled everything that came my way. I carried out portraits of company directors for their retirement dinner menu covers, buildings for brochures, strip cartoons, maps and humorous drawings for advertisements….gardens and their plants, vegetables, mazes, refrigerators, dishwashers, totem poles, kitchen utensils, resuscitation diagrams, all kinds of furniture, typewriters, agricultural crop spraying machines, door locks, folded towels, decorative letters, Zodiac signs, animals….When you are a student there is a tendency at first to limit yourself to draw only what you like drawing. This of course ultimately shackles you and limits your repertoire …(it) narrows the margin of what you are able to depict in an image and consequently stifles imagination and ideas.

You can really see the result of this in the illustrations for this book: there are visual puns and hidden pictures everywhere. Look at the front cover- it illustrates the passage where the dormouse is telling the story of the three girls living in the treacle well:

The Dormouse had closed its eyes by this time, and was going off into a doze; but, on being pinched by the Hatter, it woke up again with a little shriek, and went on: `–that begins with an M, such as mouse-traps, and the moon, and memory, and muchness– you know you say things are “much of a muchness”–did you ever see such a thing as a drawing of a muchness?’

Lord has drawn the moon and a muchness: an infinity sign, and mousetraps, and two versions of memory: a knot- and the seahorse shaped hippocampus.

I also like the fact that all the illustrations are sen through Alice’s eyes: she doesn’t appear in them: we just see what she sees…

Lovely book, and highly recommended despite the pretty price tag… Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 547 other followers

March 2017
M T W T F S S
« Jan    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  
{lang: 'en-GB'}

Flickr Photos









More Photos
Powered by WebRing.
This site is a member of WebRing.
To browse visit Here.
free counters

%d bloggers like this: