Posts Tagged ‘alternative alice

16
Aug
19

Alitji in the Dreamtime

Alitji in the Dreamtime: a re-telling of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland story by Nancy Sheppard using Australian Aborigine language and imagery: the white rabbit has become a kangaroo and the dormouse is now a koala.

The story is told in the Pitjantjatjara language of Central Australia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pitjantjatjara) and is back-translated into English alongside.

The illustrations by Byron Sewell are rather beautifully printed in brown ink: far more elegant than black, especially on the grey-brown of the paper.

Published in 1975 by the University of Adelaide, and available from various sellers on Amazon: Alitji on Amazon

More equivalences:

  • the fan becomes a woomera
  • the caterpillar becomes a witchety grub
  • the Duchess becomes the Spirit of the North Wind
  • the Mad Hatter and the March Hare become a Stockman and a Horse
  • Croquet is played with storks and echindnas

I think this is one of my favourite alternative Alice stories: the tale is well told, the rhymes and verses stand up well and the illustrations are beautiful. It works well as a book on its own merits, and it adds dimensions to the original story. Recommended.

16
Aug
19

Janice in Tomorrow-Land

Janice in Tomorrow-Land by Emory Holloway.

Published by American Book Company, 1936.

First Edition hardback, no dustjacket.

I’m not sure who the illustrations are by, but they’re wonderful- real 1930s style idea of the future. The first picture in the book includes a stained glass window with a depiction of Alice and the White Rabbit. It’s through this window that she meets ‘Mr Merlin’, who takes her on a number of adventures…

Emory Holloway (1885 -1977) was best known for books and studies of Walt Whitman.

You can find this on Amazon: Janice in Tomorrow-Land, but it’s generally pretty scarce and certainly rather expensive.

I couldn’t resist scanning in several of the illustrations:

17
Feb
19

Malice in Kulturland

Malice in Kulturland by Horace Wyatt.

Illustrations by W. Tell.

Published by The Car Illustrated, 1914.

Hardback: brown boards with pictorial onlay, this copy has a damaged spine, but this seems to be fairly typical for this book. No dust jacket: I’m not sure if it ever had one?

This is an anti-war Alice parody, with references to the Kaiser and events of the first year of the 1914-1918 conflict. The illustrations are close parodies of the Tenniel originals.

There’s plenty of verse, including a version of Jabberwocky:

‘Twas dertag, and the slithy Huns

Did sturm and sturgel through the sludge;

All bulgeous were the blunderguns,

And the bosch bombs outbludge

Beware the Ulsterman, my son—

The jaws that bite at kin and kith;

Because the Carsonclan, and shun

The frumious Ridersmith…

…‘And is the Kaiserhog at large?

Then show him to your blarney boy!

Oh, frabjous day! Hurroo! Hurray!’

They chortled in their joy.

You can buy both the original version:MALICE IN KULTURLAND, and a modern reprint: Malice in Kulturland

I bought my copy on abebooks.

16
Feb
19

More Alice

More Alice, by Yates Wilson.

Illustrated by the author.

Published by T.V. Boardman & Co, 1959. Hardback with dust jacket.

A follow-up to the Alice stories in response to a request from the author’s daughter, and according to the jacket:

“written unashamedly in the style of Lewis Carroll and illustrated with John Tenniel’s illustrations in mind.”

I love the chameleon on the dust jacket, and the black and white internal pictures are also charming. The only thing I can find out about Yates Wilson is that he also produced public information posters in world war two. Any other information welcome!

Bought for £15 on abebooks.

Available on amazon: More’Alice,’

12
Feb
19

Engineer Through the Looking Glass

Engineer Through the Looking Glass by Eric Laithwaite.

Published by the British Broadcasting Corporation, 1980. Illustrated by Michael Brownlow, with photographs by Neville Miles. Hardback.

Engineering is fun, argues the author and to prove it he takes us on a journey of exploration as strange and as absorbing as Alice’s adventures in the Looking Glass World.

This book is based on Laithwaite’s 1974 Royal Institution Christmas Lectures, which I remember being completely amazed and fascinated by as a child: it’s these and the Carl Sagan ones that I remember- the others have faded from memory.

There are lots of Alice references: the chapters/ lectures include:

  • Looking Glass House- on symmetry
  • Tweedledum and Tweedledee- on ‘handedness’ and chirality
  • Jam Tomorrow and Jam Yesterday- on odds and evens
  • The Jabberwock- on gyroscopes, gyreing and gimbaling in the wabe.

From wiki:

In 1974, Laithwaite was invited by the Royal Institution to give a talk on a subject of his own choosing. He decided to lecture about gyroscopes, a subject in which he had only recently become interested. His interest had been aroused by an amateur inventor named Alex Jones, who contacted Laithwaite about a reactionless propulsion drive he (Jones) had invented. After seeing a demonstration of Jones’s small prototype (a small wagon with a swinging pendulum which advanced intermittently along a table top), Laithwaite became convinced that “he had seen something impossible”. In his lecture before the Royal Institution he claimed that gyroscopes weigh less when spinning, and to demonstrate this he showed that he could lift a spinning gyroscope mounted on the end of a rod easily with one hand, but could not do so when the gyroscope was not spinning. At this time, Laithwaite suggested that Newton’s laws of motion could not account for the behavior of gyroscopes, and that they could be used as a means of reactionless propulsion. The members of the Royal Institution rejected his ideas, and his lecture was not published. (This was the first and only time an invited lecture to the Royal Institution has not been published.)

Shame, really.

He was also an expert on moths, publishing The Dictionary of Butterflies and Moths in Colour along with Allan Watson.

Various books available on amazon: Eric Laithwaite books

16
Sep
17

Alice and the Space Telescope

Alice and the Space Telescope by Malcolm Longair, with forward by Nobel Prizewinner Riccardo Giacconi. Published by The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1989.

4to hardcover with dustjacket. First edition.

ISBN: 0-8018-2831-7

The book explains and discusses some of the things going on in astrophysics from the time of the launch of the Hubble telescope, and yet still manages to be funny at the same time.

It makes me think of The Big Bang Theory. I wonder what Sheldon would make of it?

There’s also a rewrite of Jabberwocky, which is always good value… even if the scansion is a little off…

Twas brillig and the slithy toves/Brought plans of telescopes fair to see./ The Jabberwock, he clapped his hands/And said, ‘That’s just for me.

Loads of pictures- some of Tenniel’s, various graphs and scientific diagrams, and photos.

Available via amazon: Alice and the Space Telescope, but mine was a present. Thanks Iain!

02
Mar
16

Scenes from Alice in Wonderland for the Pianoforte

image1 (1)Scenes from Alice in Wonderland for the Pianoforte by Frank Lynes, Opus 50.

Published by Alfred Lengnick & Co. Ltd (1908).

Frank Lynes (1858 – 1913) was an American pianist, teacher and composer. He was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He attended the New England Conservatory at Boston, and later the Leipzig Conservatory. Among his compositions are gavottes for piano and violin, a romanza for violin, ‘cello, organ, and piano, sonatinas, a Te Deum, and many songs, often written for his students.

Includes pieces titled Through the Looking Glass, On the Train, Tweedledum and Tweedledee (video above), Humpty Dumpty and Queen Alice.

image1

Occasionally available on Amazon




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