Posts Tagged ‘alice

20
Jun
13

Peter and Alice

paPeter and Alice programme.

From the production at the Noel Coward theatre, May 2013.

Judi Dench plays Alice Liddell and Ben Whishaw Peter Llewelyn Davis (Peter Pan). The two meet behind the scenes in a bookshop: their encounter actually took place in 1932, when Alice was 80 and Peter 35.  The Skyfall writer John Logan has imagined what might have been discussed between them….

The fictional Alice and Peter also appear on stage with the two now adult models for the characters, and prod them into recollections joyful and painful.

Sets have lots of Alice touches. I wish I could have photographed them…

12
Jun
11

alice in thunderland

Alice in Thunderland: A Feminist Fairytale by Maeve Kelly. Published 1993 by Attic. ?First edition paperback? ISBN: 1-85594-081-7

Cover illustration by Trina Mahon.

Alice (a native of Harmony land) travels through Thunderland, run by the memblies. They rule over the femblies, who don’t ask questions, and believe that too much thinking makes your brain turn to feathers…

My copy has a biro dedication on first page, and also a bookcrossing label inside as it was a gift from a bookcrossing friend. Thanks, Esther!

I do love the front cover with the Alice in DMs. Good choice for tromping about in an alternative world, I reckon.

Available on amazon: Alice in Thunderland (Fairytales for Feminists)

06
Jun
11

Janice in Tomorrow-Land

Janice in Tomorrow-Land by Emory Holloway.

Published by American Book Company, 1936.

First Edition hardback, no dustjacket.

I’m not sure who the illustrations are by, but they’re wonderful- real 1930s style idea of the future. The first picture in the book includes a stained glass window with a depiction of Alice and the White Rabbit. It’s through this window that she meets ‘Mr Merlin’, who takes her on a number of adventures…

Emory Holloway (1885 -1977) was best known for books and studies of Walt Whitman.

You can find this on Amazon: Janice in Tomorrow-Land, but it’s generally pretty scarce and certainly rather expensive.

I couldn’t resist scanning in several of the illustrations:

23
May
11

Alice by Whoopi Goldberg

Alice by Whoopi Goldberg.

Illustrated by John Rocco.

Published by Bantam, 1992, Hardback, first edition with dustjacket.

ISBN: 9780553089905

Very odd: Alice looks like an aging hooker…

From the dustjacket:

Listen up – you’re about to lose control on a topsy-turvy adventure with a girl named Alice, one very cool, semi-invisible rabbit, a card-playing misfit with some serious headgear, and the wickedest queen you’ve ever seen! “Wait just one minute,” you say, “I’ve heard this story before.” Baby, you’ve never heard it like this. This tale is told by Whoopi Goldberg, the most outrageous storyteller around. This isn’t Wonderland, it’s the big, bad city. And these characters aren’t like any you’ve ever met. You’re about to find out that this town is bursting with crazy surprises. See, Alice has won a mysterious prize worth big bucks that she’s sure will change her life forever. But first she’s got to claim it – in person. Take off with Alice down streets where bendy buildings wave over your head. Watch the kaleidoscope colors of graffiti fly by on the subway. Even stop off at a diner that shrinks up smaller than your lunchbox. Just don’t linger too long over that tiny hamburger (even if those loony twin waiters do crack you up) because there’s a snooty uptown queen who’s just itching to snatch the prize ticket away from Alice. Join some new friends in a dizzying race against time that’s sure to mess up your hairdo and remind you that wild and wonderful things can happen in worlds as nearby as your very own neighborhood.

Review from Michael Cart, formerly at Beverly Hills Public Library (that I tend to agree with):

Goldberg’s first literary effort is compromised in several important ways: first of all, as its title suggests, the book attempts to be an urban pastiche of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland . This would be okay if the device were integral to the plot or even to the spirit and tone of the book. Unfortunately, it is neither. A second problem is that its premise is tired and its resolution predictable: the eponymous hero, Alice, is a young African-American girl living in New Jersey (well, at least the text tells us she’s young; in the illustrations she looks as if she’s about 42) who wants to be rich. Why she wants this is unclear, since she lives in a “nice” single-family house on a “nice” suburban street. Nevertheless, she enters countless sweepstakes and, no surprise, one day she receives a notification that she is a “WINNER.” To collect her prize she must go to New York City. Gathering up her friends (a Mad Hatter look-alike named Robin and an invisible rabbit–borrowed from the play “Harvey”), off she goes to the Mean Streets. There she meets a greedy rich woman who tries to steal her winning ticket; and, of course, it turns out that the sweepstakes is a scam and, of course, Alice comes to realize that she is already rich–in friendship. This is not only tired but trite, especially since Alice doesn’t learn this lesson herself; instead a fortune-teller informs her. The biggest problem of all, however, is that this is not a book for children; it’s a commercial package, which, in its style and sensibility–especially as captured in Rocco’s stridently expressionistic illustrations–is designed to appeal to adults shopping in a retail store.

Available on Amazon: Alice

21
May
11

“Read Me” Leaflet: Brighton reads Alice in Wonderland

Read me: Leaflet advertising the Brighton City read to celebrate Penguin’s 70th anniversary in 2005.

8 pages of quotes, information and trivia. I do like the Warholesque cover.

From the City-wide reading initiative website:

Going underground! Brighton and Hove burrows into the most curious book of the 19th century: Between March and May, The Word in collaboration with Brighton Festival and other local organizations, is encouraging the whole city to read the first children’s book with a crossover appeal to adults – Lewis Carroll’s Alice In Wonderland. Carroll was a frequent visitor to Brighton from 1864 to 1887, staying with his old Christ Church friend the Reverend Henry Barclay at 11 Sussex Square and, in 1887 he watched the stage version of Alice being performed at the Theatre Royal. He is said to have got inspiration for the rabbit hole from a small underground tunnel running down to the sea in Brighton.

16
May
11

Alec’s Adventures in Railwayland

Alec’s adventures in Railwayland by L. T. C. Rolt Published 1964 by Ian Allan (London).

Lionel Thomas Caswall Rolt (1910–1974) was the biographer of Isambard Kingdom Brunel and Thomas Telford. He was an enthusiast for both vintage cars and heritage railways.

This is a satirical look at Dr. Beeching’s reforms written as an Alice sequel.  A very sweet little pamphlet of a book, with illustrations by Margaret Calvert.

New characters include:

  • Alec- the adventurer
  • The Mad Porter
  • The Dip Tech
  • The Pro
  • The Graphon
  • The Icy King
  • Familiar characters include the Tweedles and the Dormouse.

    46 pages, softback, stapled.
    Sometimes available on amazon: Alec’s adventures in Railwayland

    13
    Apr
    11

    Alice Where Art Thou? More Guinness Carrolling

    Alice, Where Art Thou? (More Guinness Carrolling).

    Pamphlet with 16 stapled pages.

    1952: Printed by John Waddington Ltd., Leeds, England, on John Dickinson & Co. Ltd. Evensyde Paper

    Illustrations by Antony Groves-Raines, who was also involved in designing posters for the Underground.

    Guinness began sending promotional booklets to doctors in 1933, breaking off during World War 2, and restarting again in 1950.
    In all, 24 were made, of which five are based on the Alice books: this is the fourth of the five. All of the booklets were produced by the advertising agency SH Benson, who were also responsible for many of the iconic Guinness ads of the period.

    There are parodies of episodes from both Alice books, and from The Hunting of the Snark, along with Alice finding herself in new situations such as Alice in Snowmansland and Alice in Posterland.

    My copy was bought fairly cheaply on ebay: you might be lucky and do the same, or you can usually find it for around the 80 quid mark on abebooks or amazon: Alice, where art thou?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    28
    Mar
    11

    Alitji in the Dreamtime

    Alitji in the Dreamtime: a re-telling of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland story by Nancy Sheppard using Australian Aborigine language and imagery: the white rabbit has become a kangaroo and the dormouse is now a koala.

    The story is told in the Pitjantjatjara language of Central Australia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pitjantjatjara) and is back-translated into English alongside.

    The illustrations by Byron Sewell are rather beautifully printed in brown ink: far more elegant than black, especially on the grey-brown of the paper.

    Published in 1975 by the University of Adelaide, and available from various sellers on Amazon: Alitji on Amazon

    More equivalences:

    • the fan becomes a woomera
    • the caterpillar becomes a witchety grub
    • the Duchess becomes the Spirit of the North Wind
    • the Mad Hatter and the March Hare become a Stockman and a Horse
    • Croquet is played with storks and echindnas

    I think this is one of my favourite alternative Alice stories: the tale is well told, the rhymes and verses stand up well and the illustrations are beautiful. It works well as a book on its own merits, and it adds dimensions to the original story. Recommended.

    19
    Jan
    11

    alice through the looking glass: 1872 edition

    Alice Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll

    50 illustrations by John Tenniel. Red hardcover with gilt trim and all page edges gilt. Published by Macmillan & Co. 1872. Twenty first thousand. (First edition but later printing). Publisher’s advertisements at the back.

    It’s surprising how reasonably you can pick up early Looking Glass printings. There are several of these on abebooks for around the 25-30 quid mark. You wouldn’t get a Wonderland for that…

    Having said that, this is very precious to me- it’s my oldest book and was given as an anonymous Christmas present. Although I have a shrewd idea who from…

    02
    Jan
    11

    Alice in the Delighted States

    Alice in the Delighted States by Edward Hope.

    Illustrated by Rea Irvin, who was the first art editor of the New Yorker.

    Published by The Dial Press, Lincoln Mac Veagh, 1928. Hardback, no dust jacket.

    Written as a parody of social and political foibles: Alice arrives in the Delighted States, via the stem of a drinking glass. She meets Rotarians, to whom she refuses to make a speech- the Rotarian next to commenting “That comes from being too subjunctive and makes the situation tense.”

    She meets Twaddle-dum and Twiddle-dee, one labeled H. L. M.  and the other, G. J. N. A slip of paper in my copy reveals that these two are Henry L. Mencken (American journalist, essayist and critic) and George Jean Nathan (an American critic).

    Later Alice begins to grow, and becomes much too large for her clothes- causing a case of Indecent Exposure. She goes to court where the lawyers of the Persecution and Pretense call ‘witlesses’ and select a jury full of frightened white rabbits, parrots, and a sleepy possum. The judge is wrapped up in red tape. A ‘very cross examination’ is interrupted by news: PRIZE BEAUTY SLAYS LOVE MATE WITH ICE PICK AFTER JAZZ PARTY IN RICH NEST, and Alice’s trial is over- Alice is advised to go into vaudeville, or write her Life Story. She ends up in Washington with elephants, donkeys and Uncle Sam, and then awakes in her father’s chair.

    Edward Hope wrote for the New York Herald Tribune.

    Bought on abebooks.

    Sometimes available on amazon: Delighted States




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