Posts Tagged ‘alice spoof



11
Feb
13

Girls in Bookland

Girls in Bookland by Hildegarde Hawthorne (1871–1952). She was a U.S. poet and author, and was the grandaughter of Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Illustrated by John Wolcott Adams: an American draftsman and illustrator, 1874-1925.

Published by George H. Doran, 1917. Hardback first edition, no dustjacket.

Rose and Ruth visit their heroes from favourite books, including Alice and her friends in the chapter A Looking Glass Visit. There’s a nice picture of them all: see below or via the online link.

The full contents:

How it began to open.–The winner of the torch race.–An adventure with Little women.–A looking glass visit.–A tournament and a rescue with Rowena.–Afternoon tea in Cranford. A letter from Lorna.–Little Maid Marion.–The adventure in Guinevere’s castle.–In the Hielands with Di Vernon.–A summer day with Ramona.–Romola and the Florentine boy.–Little Nell and the bun-shop.–Evangeline and the big bear.–The little Quaker-city maid

Available to read on-line.

10
Jan
13

Blue Alice

scan0041Blue Alice: A Trip Through a Sexual Wonderland by Jackson Short.

Paperback. Published by Dell, 1972. First printing.

Alice seems to be a popular subject for ‘adult’ interpretations. The back cover of this book says “”Once upon a time there was a wee sexy miss named Alice”.

From the blurb:

Curiouser and curiouser!

Poor Alice. First there was the White Hophead who led her astray… then Timothy J. Caterpillar, the psychedelic guru with his unusual methods of instruction… then General March O’Hare and General Mad Anthony Hatter, both wigged out of their skulls on Hanoi Gold… then Tricky Dick Cheshire, who was willing to do anything to make everyone, and especially Alice, love him… then Horatio H. Humpty, who gets his kicks with his ever ready mouth… next came the White Knight of New York, who liked it best on horseback… and the Red Queen, who showed Alice a new way to a woman’s heart,,,

Yes indeed, things were getting curiouser and curiouser for Alice- and the worst, and best, was yet to come…

Fantastic 1970’s stylee cover art…

02
Jan
13

Alicia in Blunderland

scan0001Alicia in Blunderland by Peter Schuyler Miller. Introduction by Lloyd Arthur Eshbach.

Small hardback with dustjacket, Published by Oswald Train, 1983. First edition. Number 112 of 500.

Dust jacket art by Stephen E. Fabian.

P. Schuyler Miller (1912-1974) was an American critic and science fiction writer. In 1933 he wrote Alicia in Blunderland: publishing it serially in Science Fiction Digest magazine under the byline ‘Nihil”. This book brings the episodes together in a limited format along with an introduction by Lloyd Arthur Eshbach (1910-2003), another American SciFi writer.

Alicia meets characters and writers of science fiction of the period.

Bought in Marchpane Books, Cecil Court.

Available on Amazon: Alicia in Blunderland

05
Oct
12

Alice in Blunderland: an Iridescent Dream

Alice in Blunderland: an Iridescent Dream by John Kendrick Bangs.

Illustrated by Albert Levering.

Published by Doubleday, Page & Company, New York, 1907. Hardback clothbound first edition: no dustjacket. 12mo.

Bangs (1862-1922) was an American writer, essayist and lecturer, and he turns Alice turns into a political satire

Alice travels to Blunderland, where “everything goes just right”: assuming you believe the keepers of the Municipal Home of Children, where all the children live. Appearances by the dormouse, the Duchess, the Mad Hatter, the Cheshire Cat and the White Knight.

From Alice in Blunderland:

“Certain of our members claim that they have a right to sell their votes for $500 apiece–”

“Mercy!” cried Alice, “Why, that is–that is terrible.”

“It certainly is,” said the March Hare ruefully, it’s rotten. Here I’ve been holding out for $1,250 for mine, and these duffers want to go in for a cut rate that will absolutely ruin the business.”

There’s a facsimile version available: Alice in Blunderland: An Iridescent Dream

The Mad Hatter talking through his hat.

25
Feb
12

Allies in Wilhelmsland

Allies in Wilhelmsland by J.G.R.H. & C.T. (with apologies to “Alice in Wonderland”)

Published by ‘s.n’ in 1914- printed by Ford and Co.

J.G.R.H. is J.G. Russell Harvey and C.T. is Charles (or Charlie) Thomas: between them they seem to have written several wartime verse spoofs including Rhymes of the Times for War Babies of all Ages.

The included verses originally appeared in ‘The Bristol Times and Mirror’ and ‘The Western Daily Press”.

The book is really a pamphlet of 12 pages with parodies of some of the poems from Wonderland: all poking fun at the Kaiser.

Really tatty copy- all the pages are loose and the cover is in two pieces, but it’s the only one I’ve been able to find.

Notes on the text read:

Deutschland unter Alles.

“Sold for the benefit of the Belgian Refugees’ Relief Fund”

“The authors, J.G. Russell Harvey and Charles Thomas are much indebted to Messrs. A.W. Ford & Co., Ltd. Bristol, for printing this booklet at a purely nominal cost”

10
Feb
12

Owens Corning Fiberglas: Alice in Insulationland

Advert from 1958 magazine. The page is too big for my scanner, so I had to make do with a photo- hope you can still read it all ok.

I’ve looked up Owens Corning, and they still exist- in fact they’re ‘the world’s largest manufacturer of fiberglass and related products’ according to wikipedia. I’m sure Alice helped.

It’s not the only time they used her, either:

“Alice in the Wonderland of glass” photographs, 1937.  Owens Corning Inc. Records, MSS-222.
The year before Owens-Corning Fiberglas was spun off as a separate company, Owens-Illinois developed a marketing campaign built around the wonder of glass.  It featured the character “Alice,” who visited the various manufacturing facilities to find out more about this “wonder” product.  Here, “Alice” watches workers make Fiberglas insulation.

23
Jan
12

Alice’s Adventures in Pictureland

Alice’s Adventures in Pictureland: A Tale Inspired by Lewis Carroll’s Wonderland by Florence Adèle Evans.

Illustrated by Albertine Randall Wheelan.

Published 1900. Hardback, no dustjacket. Published by The Dodge Publishing Company.

Rather nice black and white plates and many text illustrations.

A young niece of Alice first becomes involved in adventures with a number of Wonderland characters, and then the book continues with stories told to her by various animals.

Albertine Randall Wheelan was a costume designer and cartoonist, who drew The Dumbunnies during the 1920s. She was born in San Francisco, the youngest of four children, and attended the San Francisco School of Design. She drew magazine illustrations for Harper’s Bazaar, Harper’s Young People, St. Nicholas and others.

There’s an Evertype version available on Amazon: Pictureland




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