Archive for the 'odds and sods' Category

25
May
15

Lunch Lady and the League of Librarians

Lunch Lady and the League of Librarianslunch ladyLunch Lady and the League of Librarians by Jarrett J. Krosoczka

Illustrated by the author.

Published by Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers (28 July 2009)

ISBN-13: 978-0375846847

Not strictly an Alice book, but features Alice characters used as weapons in an epic battle between librarians and dinner ladies!

Jarrett J. Krosoczka has his own website if you want to find out more.

From the publisher:

Lunch Lady can sniff out something rotten like no one else—and there’s definitely something rotten going on in the library. The usually friendly librarians have become cold and secretive. Even Dee can’t seem to crack a smile out of them. What darkness may lurk in the hearts of librarians? Lunch Lady is on the case! And Hector, Terrence, and Dee are along for a wild ride!

24
May
15

Time Out Rabbit Hole Issue

time outTime Out: Rabbit Hole Issue.

April 29-May 5 2014.

Free London listings magazine.

time out0001

24
May
15

Alice Stamps- January 2015

stampsAlice Stamps- January 2015

Date of issue: 06/01/2015

Design: Godfrey Design

Illustrations: Grahame Baker-Smith

Published by the Royal Mail, to celebrate 150 years since publication of the book.

This is the Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Presentation Pack’, with text written by Professor Hugh Haughton.

The Stamps depict ten scenes and characters: The White Rabbit, Drink Me, The Cheshire Cat, The Queen of Hearts, Alice’s Evidence, Down the Rabbit Hole, The White Rabbit’s House, A Mad Tea Party, The Game of Croquet and A Pack of Cards.

From the Royal Mail site:

The White Rabbit Second Class The legendary rabbit in a hurry takes Alice on an extraordinary journey that changes her life forever. On the stamp she is shown in hot pursuit of the White Rabbit – and adventure – away from a sunny but boring day by the river with her sister.

Down The Rabbit Hole Alice Second Class chases the strange creature into a rabbit hole but an ordinary everyday burrow this is not. Soon the little girl is floating down, down a deep chasm past walls smothered in bookshelves, pictures and maps.

Drink Me First Class At the bottom Alice glimpses a charming garden she can see beyond a tiny door she is too big to go through. She finds a bottle of potion with a painted label imploring ‘drink me’. Alice drinks, then shrinks, but now is too small to fetch the key for the door she found on a table. She eventually reaches the ‘shores’ of Wonderland by swimming away through a pool of her tears formed when the Eat Me cakes grew her.

The White Rabbit’s House First Class The White Rabbit mistakes Alice for his maid and sends her to his house to fetch his gloves and fan. After drinking from another bottle, she grows enormous, and is cramped to the rafters of the Rabbit’s tiny home. After eating a magic cake, Alice shrinks again and is able to escape.

The Cheshire Cat 81p With an ever-present, all-knowing grin, the Cheshire cat lounges on the branch of a tree and explains that everyone in Wonderland is mad, pointing Alice in the direction of two of its leading lunatics – the Hatter and the March Hare. Then, tail-first, the Cat incrementally vanishes, leaving his grin hanging eerily in the air.

A Mad Tea Party 81p Alice suffers a bewildering tea party with the Hatter, the Hare and the much-abused Dormouse, who is used as a cushion then dunked in the teapot. The Hatter offers her wine he does not have and asks her a riddle he has no answer to.

The Queen Of Hearts £1.28 Alice meets Wonderland’s most dangerous resident, the murderous Queen of Hearts – motto: ‘Off with his/her/their head(s)’ – and almost immediately faces execution by being cheeky. Alice is saved only by her own stubborn courage and the King of Hearts’ gentle intervention.

The Game Of Croquet £1.28 Unsurprisingly it is bonkers. The mallets are flamingos, the balls are hedgehogs and the hoops are the Queen’s soldiers gamely bending themselves in two. Alice finds the game rather a challenge, since all the equipment has a habit of moving about of its own accord.

Alice’s Evidence £1.47 Alice is called to give evidence in the trial of the Knave of Hearts, accused of stealing the Queen of Hearts’ tarts. Needless to say, the hearing is a farce. When the Queen demands sentencing first and verdict second, Alice loses her patience, saying: ‘Who cares for you? You’re nothing but a pack of cards!’

A Pack Of Cards £1.47 Alice’s accusation breaks the spell of Wonderland. The courtiers rise as a pack of simple playing cards and fly at her alarmingly. Alice wakes on the riverbank, the cards merely dead leaves her sister is brushing from her face. Alice reveals her dream before running in for tea. Her sister then has her own dream of Alice’s future, as a grown woman telling little children of the adventure in Wonderland she had long ago.

06
Jul
14

The Wonderland Postage-Stamp Case

Picture 14The Wonderland Postage-Stamp Case Along with Eight or Nine Wise Words About Letter-Writing by Lewis Carroll.

Modern French facsimile edition of the original, which was published by Emberlin and Son in 1890 and was sold in a printed envelope, together with a pamphlet written by Carroll.

I wish I could afford an original

From the pamphlet (although mine is in French):

Some American writer has said “the snakes in this district may be divided into one species—the venomous.” The same principle applies here. Postage-Stamp-Cases may be divided into one species, the “Wonderland.” Imitations of it will soon appear, no doubt: but they cannot include the two Pictorial Surprises, which are copyright.

You don’t see why I call them ‘Surprises’? Well, take the Case in your left-hand, and regard it attentively. You see Alice nursing the Duchess’s Baby? (An entirely new combination, by the way: it doesn’t occur in the book.) Now, with your right thumb and forefinger, lay hold of the little book, and suddenly pull it out. The Baby has turned into a Pig! If that doesn’t surprise you, why, I suppose you wouldn’t be surprised if your own Mother-in-law suddenly turned into a Gyroscope!

0384-ob1995_416_3

Inside there are sections for different value stamps of the time, with an extra slot for the most commonly used onepenny stamp..

0384-ob1995_416_2

 

Occasionally available on Amazon.

05
Jul
14

First Day Cover 1994

1994_Greet_PO_sloganFirst Day Cover 1994.

Mad Hatter First Day Cover. There were others: yet to be tracked down…

According to the BFDC website:

First day covers are specially designed envelopes with attractive postage stamps which have been postmarked on the day the stamps were issued by the Post Office.

 

Stamps:
Dan Dare and the Mekon
Three Bears
Rupert the Bear
Alice
Noggin the Nog
Peter Rabbit
Red Riding Hood and the Big Bad Wolf
Orlando the Marmalade Cat
Biggles
Paddington Bear
This isn’t my actual envelope I’m afraid- my lack of scanner is impeding me. Mine has the stamps all level rather than split, and is postmarked Nottingham.
30
Sep
13

Royal Mail Stamps: “The Magical World of Children’s Literature”

scan0001Royal Mail Stamps: “The Magical World of Children’s Literature”, designed by Peter Malone.

Royal Mail, 1998. First day cover.

This series of stamps illustrating classic children’s literature marked the centenaries both of the death of Lewis Carroll and the birth of C. S. Lewis.

The 20p stamp shows Bilbo Baggins and Smaug from The Hobbit; the 26p one depicts Mr. Tumnus, Lucy, and Aslan from The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe; 37p is the children from E. Nesbit’s The Phoenix and the Carpet and 43p has Pod and Arrietty from The Borrowers. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland  is naturally the subject of the most expensive 63p stamp, with  Alice and the Red Queen running as fast as they can to stay where they are.

Just at this moment, somehow or other, they began to run.

Alice never could quite make out, in thinking it over afterwards, how it was that they began: all she remembers is, that they were running hand in hand, and the Queen went so fast that it was all she could do to keep up with her: and still the Queen kept crying ‘Faster! Faster!’ but Alice felt she could not go faster, though she had not breath left to say so.

The most curious part of the thing was, that the trees and the other things round them never changed their places at all: however fast they went, they never seemed to pass anything. ‘I wonder if all the things move along with us?’ thought poor puzzled Alice. And the Queen seemed to guess her thoughts, for she cried, ‘Faster! Don’t try to talk!’

Not that Alice had any idea of doing that. She felt as if she would never be able to talk again, she was getting so much out of breath: and still the Queen cried ‘Faster! Faster!’ and dragged her along. ‘Are we nearly there?’ Alice managed to pant out at last.

‘Nearly there!’ the Queen repeated. ‘Why, we passed it ten minutes ago! Faster!’ And they ran on for a time in silence, with the wind whistling in Alice’s ears, and almost blowing her hair off her head, she fancied.

‘Now! Now!’ cried the Queen. ‘Faster! Faster!’ And they went so fast that at last they seemed to skim through the air, hardly touching the ground with their feet, till suddenly, just as Alice was getting quite exhausted, they stopped, and she found herself sitting on the ground, breathless and giddy.

The Queen propped her up against a tree, and said kindly, ‘You may rest a little now.’

Alice looked round her in great surprise. ‘Why, I do believe we’ve been under this tree the whole time! Everything’s just as it was!’

‘Of course it is,’ said the Queen, ‘what would you have it?’

‘Well, in our country,’ said Alice, still panting a little, ‘you’d generally get to somewhere else — if you ran very fast for a long time, as we’ve been doing.’

‘A slow sort of country!’ said the Queen. ‘Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that!’

Bought for the magnificent sum of 80p in an antique shop in Snape Maltings.

l_carrollkaart

 

 

09
Sep
13

Iris Theatre’s Alice in Wonderland Programme

2C057EF19-B119-20E5-70F8BD3802B33FD8Iris Theatre’s Alice in Wonderland Programme.

Theatre programme, published July 2012.

According to their website:

Iris Theatre was created in 2007 to produce a production of T.S. Eliot’s Murder in the Cathedral at the world famous St. Paul’s Church in Covent Garden, right in the heart of Central London. The success of that production led on to further shows, more success, and a dynamic company which has grown year on year. We gained full charity status in Oct 2009 with a mission to support the development of the next generation of professional theatre practitioners across all theatre forms.

They’re now resident at St. Paul’s, and it was in the grounds and body of the church that the action took place. The story was told with energy, imagination and enthusiasm by the small (and apart from Alice, male) cast, and the different sets were really delightful, as was the initial journey down the rabbit hole. Shame it’s finished, or I’d recommend you to go…

Fran about to go down the Rabbit Hole.

Fran about to go down the Rabbit Hole.




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