Archive for the 'illustrators' Category


Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Pop Up Book

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland: Panorama PopsNZ051medAlice’s Adventures in Wonderland Pop Up Book with text by Lewis Carroll.

Illustrated by Grahame Baker-Smith.

Published 2015 by Walker Books Ltd in association with Royal Mail

Biography of Grahame Baker-Smith here.

From the publisher’s blurb:

Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is brought to life with this exquisite three-dimensional cut-paper gift edition created in association with Royal Mail. Presented in a charming slipcase, the book unfolds to reveal ten of the most famous moments in this classic story, from Alice falling down the rabbit-hole to the Mad-Hatter’s tea party. The beautiful illustrations by Grahame Baker-Smith (winner of the Kate Greenaway Medal), art directed by Godfrey Design, were commissioned by Royal Mail for a set of special commemorative stamps to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the publication of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.


Alice Stamps- January 2015

stampsAlice Stamps- January 2015

Date of issue: 06/01/2015

Design: Godfrey Design

Illustrations: Grahame Baker-Smith

Published by the Royal Mail, to celebrate 150 years since publication of the book.

This is the Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Presentation Pack’, with text written by Professor Hugh Haughton.

The Stamps depict ten scenes and characters: The White Rabbit, Drink Me, The Cheshire Cat, The Queen of Hearts, Alice’s Evidence, Down the Rabbit Hole, The White Rabbit’s House, A Mad Tea Party, The Game of Croquet and A Pack of Cards.

From the Royal Mail site:

The White Rabbit Second Class The legendary rabbit in a hurry takes Alice on an extraordinary journey that changes her life forever. On the stamp she is shown in hot pursuit of the White Rabbit – and adventure – away from a sunny but boring day by the river with her sister.

Down The Rabbit Hole Alice Second Class chases the strange creature into a rabbit hole but an ordinary everyday burrow this is not. Soon the little girl is floating down, down a deep chasm past walls smothered in bookshelves, pictures and maps.

Drink Me First Class At the bottom Alice glimpses a charming garden she can see beyond a tiny door she is too big to go through. She finds a bottle of potion with a painted label imploring ‘drink me’. Alice drinks, then shrinks, but now is too small to fetch the key for the door she found on a table. She eventually reaches the ‘shores’ of Wonderland by swimming away through a pool of her tears formed when the Eat Me cakes grew her.

The White Rabbit’s House First Class The White Rabbit mistakes Alice for his maid and sends her to his house to fetch his gloves and fan. After drinking from another bottle, she grows enormous, and is cramped to the rafters of the Rabbit’s tiny home. After eating a magic cake, Alice shrinks again and is able to escape.

The Cheshire Cat 81p With an ever-present, all-knowing grin, the Cheshire cat lounges on the branch of a tree and explains that everyone in Wonderland is mad, pointing Alice in the direction of two of its leading lunatics – the Hatter and the March Hare. Then, tail-first, the Cat incrementally vanishes, leaving his grin hanging eerily in the air.

A Mad Tea Party 81p Alice suffers a bewildering tea party with the Hatter, the Hare and the much-abused Dormouse, who is used as a cushion then dunked in the teapot. The Hatter offers her wine he does not have and asks her a riddle he has no answer to.

The Queen Of Hearts £1.28 Alice meets Wonderland’s most dangerous resident, the murderous Queen of Hearts – motto: ‘Off with his/her/their head(s)’ – and almost immediately faces execution by being cheeky. Alice is saved only by her own stubborn courage and the King of Hearts’ gentle intervention.

The Game Of Croquet £1.28 Unsurprisingly it is bonkers. The mallets are flamingos, the balls are hedgehogs and the hoops are the Queen’s soldiers gamely bending themselves in two. Alice finds the game rather a challenge, since all the equipment has a habit of moving about of its own accord.

Alice’s Evidence £1.47 Alice is called to give evidence in the trial of the Knave of Hearts, accused of stealing the Queen of Hearts’ tarts. Needless to say, the hearing is a farce. When the Queen demands sentencing first and verdict second, Alice loses her patience, saying: ‘Who cares for you? You’re nothing but a pack of cards!’

A Pack Of Cards £1.47 Alice’s accusation breaks the spell of Wonderland. The courtiers rise as a pack of simple playing cards and fly at her alarmingly. Alice wakes on the riverbank, the cards merely dead leaves her sister is brushing from her face. Alice reveals her dream before running in for tea. Her sister then has her own dream of Alice’s future, as a grown woman telling little children of the adventure in Wonderland she had long ago.


Alice in Wonderland: A Classic Story Pop-up Book with Sounds: Richard Johnson

ImageAlice in Wonderland: A Classic Story Pop-up Book with Sounds. By Lewis Carroll, retold by Libby Hamilton.

Illustrated by Richard Johnson.

Publisher: Silver Dolphin, 2011


ISBN-10: 1607101246

ISBN-13: 978-1607101246

Includes  5 large pop-ups and two gatefolds, and a sound chip with 5 sounds: one for each pop-up page.

Richard Johnson says:

I was approached by Templar to help work on a new series of extravagant pop-up books that incorporated sound. Lewis Carroll’s classic is, for any illustrator, a real opportunity to get stuck into the surreal environments and variety of strange and wonderful characters. 

From the publishers:

Follow Alice on her journey down the rabbit hole – meet the Cheshire Cat, go to the Mad Hatter’s tea party and hide as the Queen of Hearts comes to inspect her roses.

This amazing book combines superb sounds, astonishing pop-ups and magical illustrations in a very special retelling of Lewis Carroll’s classic tale.

Available on Amazon


Illustrated by Franciszka Themerson

IMG_0406Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There: by Lewis Carroll, illustrated by Franciszka Themerson.

Published by Inky Parrot Press (2001).

Hard back with black boards decorated with white illustrations by Themerson.

With a forward by Jasia Reichardt, and afterword by (the now rather disgraced- found guilty of six charges of indecency with a child and one charge of indecent assault against a child) Graham Ovenden.

Themerson was commissioned in 1946 (not long before copyright was up) by Harrap to illustrate Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There. Even though the blocks had been made, Harrap decided not to go ahead with publication- possibly as with the loss of copyright, the market may have been flooded with new versions, but Inky Parrot rescued and published the rather fabulous illustrations in 2001.

Published in an edition of 372 Standard copies, casebound, signed and 48 Special copies, bound in quarter leather with 6 initialled prints in a folder, but mine is a proof copy with a dedication from  Ovenden.


Available on Amazon.


Illustrating Alice

IMG_0405Illustrating Alice: An International Selection of Illustrated Editions of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass.

Published by Artists’ Choice Editions, 2013.

ISBN: 978-0-9558343-7-0

The book was issued in two versions: one standard hardback with dustjacket, limited to 600 copies, and one leather bound and including artists prints- limited to 68. Mine is the cheaper of the two…

From the publisher’s blurb:

Since 1907, when the copyright for Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland expired, there has been a world wide explosion of illustrated editions by artists who have been inspired to visualise Alice in their own fashion. There are at least three hundred illustrated English language editions and eighty from Japan. Carroll’s life and writings have been exhaustively documented but, curiously, very little has been written about the illustrated editions. The focus of Illustrating Alice is, in particular, the contemporary versions and these are discussed by experts and illustrators from nine countries. The book has a Foreword by Marina Vaizey, followed by illustrations and commentaries on the interpretation of Alice in different countries. Writers include Adriana Peliano – Brazil; Richard Newnhan – China; Selwyn Goodacre and Dennis Hall – England; Michèle Noret – France; Caterina Morelli – Italy; Prof. Mikiko Chimori – Japan; Prof. Monika Adamczyk-Garbowska – Poland; Ella Parry-Davies – Russia; Mark Burstein – United States and Canada. This is followed by reflections by artists who have illustrated Alice, with contributions by Barry Moser, De Loss McGraw and Gavin O’Keefe from the US; Ralph Steadman, John Vernon Lord, Helen Oxenbury, Emma Chichester Clark, Justin Todd, John Bradley and Michael Foreman from England; Chiara Carrer from Italy and Tatiana Ianovskaia from Russia. There is a chapter on Alice in film in which the Czech filmmaker Jan Švankmajer discusses his Alice film and Karen Lury, Prof. of Film and Television Studies, writes on Animating Alice: the heroine without a heart. Graham Ovenden writes an Afterword. An alphabetical checklist of all English language editions, compiled by Selwyn Goodacre and Edward Wakeling, is included.

This is an extremely dangerous thing for me to have bought- it opens a whole new world of books I have yet to buy, but it’s nice seeing old friends in there as well. There are loads of fantastic pictures, and articles by various illustrators (Barry Moser, Ralph Steadman, Helen Oxenbury, Jan Svankmajer). It’s printed on beautiful paper and really is a joy to handle.

Available on Amazon in both standard and special editions.


Alice Versary

Alice Versary: 1759-1959- The Guinness Birthday Book

Pamphlet of 16 pages, celebrating the 200th anniversary of Guinness.

Illustrations by Ronald Ferns

Printed by W. S. Cowell Ltd, Ipswich.

Guinness began sending promotional booklets to doctors in 1933, breaking off during World War 2, and restarting again in 1950.
In all, 24 were made, of which five are based on the Alice books: this is the last of the five. All of the booklets were produced by the advertising agency SH Benson, who were also responsible for many of the iconic Guinness ads of the period.

Ronald Ferns (14 October 1925 – 2 December 1997) was an English illustrator, designer, cartoonist and surrealist painter in both oil and watercolour.  After training at St. Martins in London, his first major official commission was a vast mural for the 1951 Festival of Britain for the Milk Marketing Board. In the same year, he was also commissioned to create the scenic design for the premiere of Fate’s Revenge by the Ballet Rambert. He later produced children’s books including The Learned Hippopotamus (1986), Caterpillar Stew (1990) and Like It Or Not (1992.

Parodies include The Fish Ball and Curiouser and Curiouser:

‘It must, I fear,’ said Alice, ‘Be something that I ate – I’m opening like a telescope at an alarming rate! And yet I can’t help thinking how useful necks like these would be in any Wonderland where Guinness grows on trees’.

Seems to be the easiest to find of the Guinness Alices. Mine was on ebay- there are usually one or two on amazon: Alice Versary


A Mad Tea-Party by Clifford Richards

tea-partyA Mad Tea-Party by Clifford Richards.

From the V&A Shop website:

A Mad Tea-Party – a celebration of British Design by Clifford Richards

Giclee print
Limited edition of 150, signed and numbered by the artist.

Created by Clifford Richards to celebrate British Design in the year 2012.  Look closely at the print to see a plethora of design classics and some familiar faces.  Now in his 70s, Clifford Richards left his advertising job in the mid 1960s to focus on creating his own products, invariably made from card and adorned with bold, colourful graphic illustration. Much of his work from the 60s and 70s is now in the V&A’s permanent collection.

The print is full of references to British design: from Gilbert and George to Dyson. It’s hard to see them all at small scale, but here’s the list if you want to have a go:

L-R: Grayson Perry and Measles, Peter Blake, David Hockney, Stephen Jones, Damien Hirst, Prof Tracey Emin wearing a dress loosely based on Vivienne Westwood’s designs, Gilbert and George, Heston Blumenthal pouring a rainbow, Terence Conran

The table leg is from the Louis Console Table by John Reeves for Heal’s. Peter Blake sits on Tom Dixon’s Offcut Stool. Stephen Jones on a Robin Day Polyprop Armchair, Terence Conran lounges in his own Cone Chair and in the foreground is Ron Arad’s Three Skin Chair.

Under the table Paul Smith is represented by his brands shopping bag and James Dyson by his Ball. There is a trash can that used to appear on old Mac computers.

On the table are a couple of Clifford Richards Urban Alphabet mugs. One showing an anglepoise lamp which was an original British design, a vase with Mary Quant’s flower and an iconic plastic squeeze Red Tomato.

At the back is bunting representing the Queen’s Jubilee, an E-Type Jaguar and Concorde.

Available from the V&A or on Amazon.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 707 other followers

November 2015
« Jul    
{lang: 'en-GB'}

Flickr Photos





More Photos
Powered by WebRing.
This site is a member of WebRing.
To browse visit Here.
free counters


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 707 other followers

%d bloggers like this: