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Janice in Tomorrow-Land

Janice in Tomorrow-Land by Emory Holloway.

Published by American Book Company, 1936.

First Edition hardback, no dustjacket.

I’m not sure who the illustrations are by, but they’re wonderful- real 1930s style idea of the future. The first picture in the book includes a stained glass window with a depiction of Alice and the White Rabbit. It’s through this window that she meets ‘Mr Merlin’, who takes her on a number of adventures…

Emory Holloway (1885 -1977) was best known for books and studies of Walt Whitman.

You can find this on Amazon: Janice in Tomorrow-Land, but it’s generally pretty scarce and certainly rather expensive.

I couldn’t resist scanning in several of the illustrations:


Little Master Carroll: Jabberwocky

downloadLittle Master Carroll: Jabberwocky

After Lewis Carroll- with text by Jennifer Adams and art by Alison Oliver.

Published by Gibbs M. Smith Inc, 10 Sept. 2013

Board book version of the poem, simplified for toddlers

Publisher’s blurb:
The slithy toves and borogoves invite you to take an adventure through the tumtum trees in Jabberwocky: A BabyLit Nonsense Primer. Jennifer Adams cleverly pulls text from Little Master Carroll’s original poem and pairs it with Alison Oliver’s bright and cheery illustrations to create a whimsical tale.


Lunch Lady and the League of Librarians

Lunch Lady and the League of Librarianslunch ladyLunch Lady and the League of Librarians by Jarrett J. Krosoczka

Illustrated by the author.

Published by Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers (28 July 2009)

ISBN-13: 978-0375846847

Not strictly an Alice book, but features Alice characters used as weapons in an epic battle between librarians and dinner ladies!

Jarrett J. Krosoczka has his own website if you want to find out more.

From the publisher:

Lunch Lady can sniff out something rotten like no one else—and there’s definitely something rotten going on in the library. The usually friendly librarians have become cold and secretive. Even Dee can’t seem to crack a smile out of them. What darkness may lurk in the hearts of librarians? Lunch Lady is on the case! And Hector, Terrence, and Dee are along for a wild ride!


Time Out Rabbit Hole Issue

time outTime Out: Rabbit Hole Issue.

April 29-May 5 2014.

Free London listings magazine.

time out0001


Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Pop Up Book

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland: Panorama PopsNZ051medAlice’s Adventures in Wonderland Pop Up Book with text by Lewis Carroll.

Illustrated by Grahame Baker-Smith.

Published 2015 by Walker Books Ltd in association with Royal Mail

Biography of Grahame Baker-Smith here.

From the publisher’s blurb:

Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is brought to life with this exquisite three-dimensional cut-paper gift edition created in association with Royal Mail. Presented in a charming slipcase, the book unfolds to reveal ten of the most famous moments in this classic story, from Alice falling down the rabbit-hole to the Mad-Hatter’s tea party. The beautiful illustrations by Grahame Baker-Smith (winner of the Kate Greenaway Medal), art directed by Godfrey Design, were commissioned by Royal Mail for a set of special commemorative stamps to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the publication of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.


Alice Stamps- January 2015

stampsAlice Stamps- January 2015

Date of issue: 06/01/2015

Design: Godfrey Design

Illustrations: Grahame Baker-Smith

Published by the Royal Mail, to celebrate 150 years since publication of the book.

This is the Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Presentation Pack’, with text written by Professor Hugh Haughton.

The Stamps depict ten scenes and characters: The White Rabbit, Drink Me, The Cheshire Cat, The Queen of Hearts, Alice’s Evidence, Down the Rabbit Hole, The White Rabbit’s House, A Mad Tea Party, The Game of Croquet and A Pack of Cards.

From the Royal Mail site:

The White Rabbit Second Class The legendary rabbit in a hurry takes Alice on an extraordinary journey that changes her life forever. On the stamp she is shown in hot pursuit of the White Rabbit – and adventure – away from a sunny but boring day by the river with her sister.

Down The Rabbit Hole Alice Second Class chases the strange creature into a rabbit hole but an ordinary everyday burrow this is not. Soon the little girl is floating down, down a deep chasm past walls smothered in bookshelves, pictures and maps.

Drink Me First Class At the bottom Alice glimpses a charming garden she can see beyond a tiny door she is too big to go through. She finds a bottle of potion with a painted label imploring ‘drink me’. Alice drinks, then shrinks, but now is too small to fetch the key for the door she found on a table. She eventually reaches the ‘shores’ of Wonderland by swimming away through a pool of her tears formed when the Eat Me cakes grew her.

The White Rabbit’s House First Class The White Rabbit mistakes Alice for his maid and sends her to his house to fetch his gloves and fan. After drinking from another bottle, she grows enormous, and is cramped to the rafters of the Rabbit’s tiny home. After eating a magic cake, Alice shrinks again and is able to escape.

The Cheshire Cat 81p With an ever-present, all-knowing grin, the Cheshire cat lounges on the branch of a tree and explains that everyone in Wonderland is mad, pointing Alice in the direction of two of its leading lunatics – the Hatter and the March Hare. Then, tail-first, the Cat incrementally vanishes, leaving his grin hanging eerily in the air.

A Mad Tea Party 81p Alice suffers a bewildering tea party with the Hatter, the Hare and the much-abused Dormouse, who is used as a cushion then dunked in the teapot. The Hatter offers her wine he does not have and asks her a riddle he has no answer to.

The Queen Of Hearts £1.28 Alice meets Wonderland’s most dangerous resident, the murderous Queen of Hearts – motto: ‘Off with his/her/their head(s)’ – and almost immediately faces execution by being cheeky. Alice is saved only by her own stubborn courage and the King of Hearts’ gentle intervention.

The Game Of Croquet £1.28 Unsurprisingly it is bonkers. The mallets are flamingos, the balls are hedgehogs and the hoops are the Queen’s soldiers gamely bending themselves in two. Alice finds the game rather a challenge, since all the equipment has a habit of moving about of its own accord.

Alice’s Evidence £1.47 Alice is called to give evidence in the trial of the Knave of Hearts, accused of stealing the Queen of Hearts’ tarts. Needless to say, the hearing is a farce. When the Queen demands sentencing first and verdict second, Alice loses her patience, saying: ‘Who cares for you? You’re nothing but a pack of cards!’

A Pack Of Cards £1.47 Alice’s accusation breaks the spell of Wonderland. The courtiers rise as a pack of simple playing cards and fly at her alarmingly. Alice wakes on the riverbank, the cards merely dead leaves her sister is brushing from her face. Alice reveals her dream before running in for tea. Her sister then has her own dream of Alice’s future, as a grown woman telling little children of the adventure in Wonderland she had long ago.


Teddy and Trots in Wonderland

Teddy and Trots in WonderlandteddytotsTeddy and Trots in Wonderland by Agnes Grozier Herbertson

Illustrated by Thomas Maybank.

First published between 1875 and 1899.

This edition published by Ward Lock: no date- looks like it’s the 1927 reprint. Hardback with dustjacket.

Teddy and Trots find a key to a white gate through which they are able to visit marvellous places such as Blue-China country, the Land of Make-Believe, and the Kingdom of Riddles.

There’s a 1910 review from the Spectator available online.

Agnes was born in Norway to a Scottish family in about 1875. She came to England around 1891 after her marriage. She published a number of children’s books, both original stories and classics ‘Retold For Little Folks‘, plus poems and six novels for adults.

Thomas Maybank was born Hector Thomas Maybank Webb in Kent on 29 February 1869. At the age of eight he was thrown from a horse, injuring his hip. He stayed in St Thomas’ Hospital for two years with the resulting bone disease.

He became a full-time artist in 1902, contributing to Punch regularly until 1909. He was the original artist of Uncle Oojah, written by Flo Lancaster in the Daily Sketch from 1921. He died in 1929.

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