Posts Tagged ‘spoof

05
Oct
12

Alice in Blunderland: an Iridescent Dream

Alice in Blunderland: an Iridescent Dream by John Kendrick Bangs.

Illustrated by Albert Levering.

Published by Doubleday, Page & Company, New York, 1907. Hardback clothbound first edition: no dustjacket. 12mo.

Bangs (1862-1922) was an American writer, essayist and lecturer, and he turns Alice turns into a political satire

Alice travels to Blunderland, where “everything goes just right”: assuming you believe the keepers of the Municipal Home of Children, where all the children live. Appearances by the dormouse, the Duchess, the Mad Hatter, the Cheshire Cat and the White Knight.

From Alice in Blunderland:

“Certain of our members claim that they have a right to sell their votes for $500 apiece–”

“Mercy!” cried Alice, “Why, that is–that is terrible.”

“It certainly is,” said the March Hare ruefully, it’s rotten. Here I’ve been holding out for $1,250 for mine, and these duffers want to go in for a cut rate that will absolutely ruin the business.”

There’s a facsimile version available: Alice in Blunderland: An Iridescent Dream

The Mad Hatter talking through his hat.

13
Aug
12

Alice Through the Paper-mill

Alice Through the Paper-mill: In Respectful Criticism of the Paper Control and Kindred Matters relating to the Present State of the Trade. A Plea for an Equitable System of Planning whereby to ensure a measure of Efficiency and a Degree of order for all Concerned. By Arthur Wragg.

Printed by C. H. Foyle of Boxfoldia, 1940 for private circulation. Hardback, second edition. No dustjacket

12 full-page b/w drawings by the author.

A satire on war-time paper control regulations.

I love the illustrations, especially Alice enjoying a crafty fag.

Available on abebooks.
On Amazon: Alice Through The Paper-Mill,

06
Jul
11

The Westminster Alice

The Westminster Alice by Hector H. Monro (“Saki”).

Illustrated by F. Carruthers Gould.

Published by The Westminster Gazette, London, 1902.

Pamphlet with lots of black & white illustrations using Tenniel’s as inspiration, plus four pages of ads at the end of the book: they’re rather fun- Jaeger, Turkish Towels and Pianolas.

Prefaced:

With apologies to Sir John Tenniel and to everybody else concerned, including Messrs. Macmillan and Co., Limited to whose courtesy we are indebted for permission to publish these political applications of the immortal adventures of Lewis Carroll’s Alice.

A collection of 11 pieces satirising parliament and the political events of 1900-1902, when the initial enthusiasm of the public for the Boer War was fading fast and questions were being asked about the government’s  handling of the conflict.

Dwindle, dwindle little war,

How I wonder more and more,

As about the veldt you hop

When you really mean to stop.

The first piece appeared in the Westminster Gazette on 15 July 1900 and the series continued until early 1902. The series proved so popular that the parts were issued together in this pamphlet.

I think mine came from abebooks, but it might have been picked up in Marchpane Books in Cecil Court.

26
Jun
11

Alice and the Space Telescope

Alice and the Space Telescope by Malcolm Longair, with forward by Nobel Prizewinner Riccardo Giacconi. Published by The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1989.

4to hardcover with dustjacket. First edition.

ISBN: 0-8018-2831-7

The book explains and discusses some of the things going on in astrophysics from the time of the launch of the Hubble telescope, and yet still manages to be funny at the same time.

It makes me think of The Big Bang Theory. I wonder what Sheldon would make of it?

There’s also a rewrite of Jabberwocky, which is always good value… even if the scansion is a little off…

Twas brillig and the slithy toves/Brought plans of telescopes fair to see./ The Jabberwock, he clapped his hands/And said, ‘That’s just for me.

Loads of pictures- some of Tenniel’s, various graphs and scientific diagrams, and photos.

Available via amazon: Alice and the Space Telescope, but mine was a present. Thanks Iain!

15
Jun
11

Alice’s Adventures in Jurisprudencia

Alice’s Adventures in Jurisprudencia by Peter F. Sloss.

Illustrated by Sally Richardson in nice imitation of Tenniel’s style.

Published by Borogrove Press 1982, softback, signed by author.

ISBN: 096082460X

In the book, a modern-day, grown up Alice, is unwinding after a long day at her lawyer’s office when she falls asleep in front of the television, and finds herself in Jurisprudencia, a  wonderland type world filled with some old friends, plus not a few pedantic lawyers. Sloss is an attorney, so I suspect he knows whereof he speaks…

He apparently got the idea after hearing a judge say:

“If words had absolute and constant referents, it might be possible to discover contractual intention in the words themselves and in the manner in which they were arranged. Words, however, do not have absolute and constant referents.”

This reminded him of Humpty’s pronouncement that…

When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said, ‘it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.’ ‘The question is,’ said Alice, ‘whether you can make words mean so many different things.’ ‘The question is,’ said Humpty Dumpty, ‘which is to be master—that’s all.’

There’s an appendix containing cited cases at the back, too…

Amazon: Alice’s adventures in Jurisprudencia

12
Jun
11

alice in thunderland

Alice in Thunderland: A Feminist Fairytale by Maeve Kelly. Published 1993 by Attic. ?First edition paperback? ISBN: 1-85594-081-7

Cover illustration by Trina Mahon.

Alice (a native of Harmony land) travels through Thunderland, run by the memblies. They rule over the femblies, who don’t ask questions, and believe that too much thinking makes your brain turn to feathers…

My copy has a biro dedication on first page, and also a bookcrossing label inside as it was a gift from a bookcrossing friend. Thanks, Esther!

I do love the front cover with the Alice in DMs. Good choice for tromping about in an alternative world, I reckon.

Available on amazon: Alice in Thunderland (Fairytales for Feminists)

05
Jun
11

Alice in Rankbustland/ Lost in the Bungle

Lost in the Bungle, with apologies to Lewis Carroll. With an introduction by the Hon. John C. Knox.

Author Edwin M. Otterbourg.

Published in 1933 by Country Life Press. 8vo, hardback black cloth stamped in gilt. No dustjacket.

This edition is titled as Lost in the Bungle but it includes the earlier Rankbustland (1923) as an appendix.

Edwin M. Otterbourg, a trial and appellate lawyer with had a particular interest in legal ethics, co-founded the firm of Otterbourg Steindler & Houston in New York City in 1909.

This is apparently “A satire on alleged abuses in the administration of the American Bankruptcy act”, but I’m not sure what that means…




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