Posts Tagged ‘satire

13
Aug
12

Alice Through the Paper-mill

Alice Through the Paper-mill: In Respectful Criticism of the Paper Control and Kindred Matters relating to the Present State of the Trade. A Plea for an Equitable System of Planning whereby to ensure a measure of Efficiency and a Degree of order for all Concerned. By Arthur Wragg.

Printed by C. H. Foyle of Boxfoldia, 1940 for private circulation. Hardback, second edition. No dustjacket

12 full-page b/w drawings by the author.

A satire on war-time paper control regulations.

I love the illustrations, especially Alice enjoying a crafty fag.

Available on abebooks.
On Amazon: Alice Through The Paper-Mill,

06
Jul
11

The Westminster Alice

The Westminster Alice by Hector H. Monro (“Saki”).

Illustrated by F. Carruthers Gould.

Published by The Westminster Gazette, London, 1902.

Pamphlet with lots of black & white illustrations using Tenniel’s as inspiration, plus four pages of ads at the end of the book: they’re rather fun- Jaeger, Turkish Towels and Pianolas.

Prefaced:

With apologies to Sir John Tenniel and to everybody else concerned, including Messrs. Macmillan and Co., Limited to whose courtesy we are indebted for permission to publish these political applications of the immortal adventures of Lewis Carroll’s Alice.

A collection of 11 pieces satirising parliament and the political events of 1900-1902, when the initial enthusiasm of the public for the Boer War was fading fast and questions were being asked about the government’s  handling of the conflict.

Dwindle, dwindle little war,

How I wonder more and more,

As about the veldt you hop

When you really mean to stop.

The first piece appeared in the Westminster Gazette on 15 July 1900 and the series continued until early 1902. The series proved so popular that the parts were issued together in this pamphlet.

I think mine came from abebooks, but it might have been picked up in Marchpane Books in Cecil Court.

15
Jun
11

Alice’s Adventures in Jurisprudencia

Alice’s Adventures in Jurisprudencia by Peter F. Sloss.

Illustrated by Sally Richardson in nice imitation of Tenniel’s style.

Published by Borogrove Press 1982, softback, signed by author.

ISBN: 096082460X

In the book, a modern-day, grown up Alice, is unwinding after a long day at her lawyer’s office when she falls asleep in front of the television, and finds herself in Jurisprudencia, a  wonderland type world filled with some old friends, plus not a few pedantic lawyers. Sloss is an attorney, so I suspect he knows whereof he speaks…

He apparently got the idea after hearing a judge say:

“If words had absolute and constant referents, it might be possible to discover contractual intention in the words themselves and in the manner in which they were arranged. Words, however, do not have absolute and constant referents.”

This reminded him of Humpty’s pronouncement that…

When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said, ‘it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.’ ‘The question is,’ said Alice, ‘whether you can make words mean so many different things.’ ‘The question is,’ said Humpty Dumpty, ‘which is to be master—that’s all.’

There’s an appendix containing cited cases at the back, too…

Amazon: Alice’s adventures in Jurisprudencia

05
Jun
11

Alice in Rankbustland/ Lost in the Bungle

Lost in the Bungle, with apologies to Lewis Carroll. With an introduction by the Hon. John C. Knox.

Author Edwin M. Otterbourg.

Published in 1933 by Country Life Press. 8vo, hardback black cloth stamped in gilt. No dustjacket.

This edition is titled as Lost in the Bungle but it includes the earlier Rankbustland (1923) as an appendix.

Edwin M. Otterbourg, a trial and appellate lawyer with had a particular interest in legal ethics, co-founded the firm of Otterbourg Steindler & Houston in New York City in 1909.

This is apparently “A satire on alleged abuses in the administration of the American Bankruptcy act”, but I’m not sure what that means…

21
May
11

Adolf in Blunderland

Adolf in Blunderland, by James Dyrenforth and Max Kester.

Illustrated by Norman Mansbridge.

Published by Frederick Muller 1939.

First edition. 8vo, in pictorial boards. No dust jacket.

Based on the authors’ radio play produced by the BBC.

The front cover shows Neville Chamberlain as the caterpillar, looking down from the mushroom on Hitler as a small boy. Plenty of other illustrations.

Norman Mansbridge was born in Wanstead (a local boy!) on 22nd July 1911. He attended Heatherley’s School of Art in London and spent his first professional years working in advertising before becoming a freelance cartoonist, contributing his first drawing to Punch Magazine in 1937. In September 1955 he became the only cartoonist to have had eight colour pages in a single issue of Punch.

He died in 1993.

Bought on abebooks for £25. There are usually a few around on Amazon too: Adolf in Blunderland

02
Jan
11

Alice in the Delighted States

Alice in the Delighted States by Edward Hope.

Illustrated by Rea Irvin, who was the first art editor of the New Yorker.

Published by The Dial Press, Lincoln Mac Veagh, 1928. Hardback, no dust jacket.

Written as a parody of social and political foibles: Alice arrives in the Delighted States, via the stem of a drinking glass. She meets Rotarians, to whom she refuses to make a speech- the Rotarian next to commenting “That comes from being too subjunctive and makes the situation tense.”

She meets Twaddle-dum and Twiddle-dee, one labeled H. L. M.  and the other, G. J. N. A slip of paper in my copy reveals that these two are Henry L. Mencken (American journalist, essayist and critic) and George Jean Nathan (an American critic).

Later Alice begins to grow, and becomes much too large for her clothes- causing a case of Indecent Exposure. She goes to court where the lawyers of the Persecution and Pretense call ‘witlesses’ and select a jury full of frightened white rabbits, parrots, and a sleepy possum. The judge is wrapped up in red tape. A ‘very cross examination’ is interrupted by news: PRIZE BEAUTY SLAYS LOVE MATE WITH ICE PICK AFTER JAZZ PARTY IN RICH NEST, and Alice’s trial is over- Alice is advised to go into vaudeville, or write her Life Story. She ends up in Washington with elephants, donkeys and Uncle Sam, and then awakes in her father’s chair.

Edward Hope wrote for the New York Herald Tribune.

Bought on abebooks.

Sometimes available on amazon: Delighted States

03
May
10

Alice in Bennetland

Alice in Bennetland by Peter A. Johnson.

Illustrated by Snark.

Published by Dog Island Enterprises. Undated, and I’m confused about dating- it’s parodying 1950s British Colombia, but I’ve seen it dated as 1972- why so much later?

8vo softback, 39 pages.

Apparently a satire on 1950s British Columbia politics: the Social Credit party and Bennett government, but my knowledge of 1950s Canadian politics is non-existent.

Ah, the power of t’internet: wiki tells me that Bennett came to power in 1952, but was there until 1972 so that would explain the publication at that time.




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