Posts Tagged ‘political satire



15
May
10

The Campaign Alice

The Campaign Alice, or through the election booth & how she lost her innocence by Jim Quinn.

Illustrated by Mike Kanarak.

Published 1971 by Mixed Media, Philadelphia. Small paperback.

A political satire of the Nixon era. He’s the only one I recognise from the illustrations.

This one is rather odd: some of the drawings verge on the pornographic (only verge, so don’t rush out to buy a copy if you’re that way inclined), and there’s an exchange where Alice thinks the Red King is about to rape her. Hmmmm.

Cheap and cheerful on abebooks.

03
May
10

Alice in Bennetland

Alice in Bennetland by Peter A. Johnson.

Illustrated by Snark.

Published by Dog Island Enterprises. Undated, and I’m confused about dating- it’s parodying 1950s British Colombia, but I’ve seen it dated as 1972- why so much later?

8vo softback, 39 pages.

Apparently a satire on 1950s British Columbia politics: the Social Credit party and Bennett government, but my knowledge of 1950s Canadian politics is non-existent.

Ah, the power of t’internet: wiki tells me that Bennett came to power in 1952, but was there until 1972 so that would explain the publication at that time.

26
Apr
10

John Bull’s Adventures in the Fiscal Wonderland

John Bull’s Adventures in the Fiscal Wonderland by Charles Geake, with 46 illustrations by Sir Francis Carruthers Gould.

Published by Methuen & Co. 1904, first edition hardback. No dust jacket.

The illustrations are caricatures of political figures of the time, and I’m not at all sure who any of them are…

From the preface:

“Our first word must be one of our sincere and appreciative acknowledgments to the Writer and Illustrator of the incomparable Alice Books-to Lewis Carroll, the one man who, if he had only been alive, could have made head or tail of Mr. Chamberlain’s figures, and to Sir John Tenniel, happily still in our midst, even though each succeeding Wednesday no longer brings with it an example of his genius. It will be noticed that in the Fiscal Wonderland one actor has to sustain more than one of the characters of the Alice dramatis personae. Mr. Balfour is not only Humpy Dumpy, but also the March Hare ; Mr. Chamberlain is at once the Mad Hatter, the Cheshire Cat, and the Knave of the Trial. For this we make no apology, since one man in his time plays many parts, and in this fiscal controversy the time has been as short as the parts have been varied. The Hatter’s riddle (on page 62) as invented had not an answer any more than Lewis Carroll’s original working model, but if an answer be desired, ” Because neither can be obtained from Birmingham” would seem to have the merit of accuracy. In writing and illustrating the Fiscal Wonderland, we do not pretend to having had no settled convictions. But whilst these have not been concealed, we venture to hope that none of the combatants in the Big Fight will find any cause of offence in this new version of the old stories, so much of which now seems only an intelligent anticipation of the present political situation. C. G. F. C. G. January, 1904.”

Bought for me as a thanks by the lovely Michael when he stayed with me for a while.

09
Apr
10

Lost in Blunderland

Lost in Blunderland by Caroline Lewis.

Illustrated by S.R.

Published by William Heinemann, 1903.

Sequel to Clara in Blunderland.

Written by Harold Begbie and J. Stafford Ransome under the pseudonym of Caroline Lewis. This reversal of Lewis Carroll’s name is pleasing to me, as his pseudonym was originally chosen by taking Dodgson’s first names (Charles Lutwidge), reversing and ‘latinising’ them to Ludovicus Carolus, and then re-Englishising them again.

As with the first book, the illustrations are credited to S.R., and I believe they were the work of the J. Stafford Ransome part of the partnership, and again they echo the Tenniels, but look like genuine political caricatures. Clara herself is Balfour.

I bought this from Stella and Rose Books. You can buy a modern reprint here.
On amazon: Blunderland

17
Feb
10

Malice in Kulturland

Malice in Kulturland by Horace Wyatt.

Illustrations by W. Tell.

Published by The Car Illustrated, 1914.

Hardback: brown boards with pictorial onlay, this copy has a damaged spine, but this seems to be fairly typical for this book. No dust jacket: I’m not sure if it ever had one?

This is an anti-war Alice parody, with references to the Kaiser and events of the first year of the 1914-1918 conflict. The illustrations are close parodies of the Tenniel originals.

There’s plenty of verse, including a version of Jabberwocky:

‘Twas dertag, and the slithy Huns
Did sturm and sturgel through the sludge;
All bulgeous were the blunderguns,
And the bosch bombs outbludge

Beware the Ulsterman, my son—
The jaws that bite at kin and kith;
Because the Carsonclan, and shun
The frumious Ridersmith…

…‘And is the Kaiserhog at large?
Then show him to your blarney boy!
Oh, frabjous day! Hurroo! Hurray!’
They chortled in their joy.

You can buy both the original version:MALICE IN KULTURLAND, and a modern reprint: Malice in Kulturland

I bought my copy on abebooks.

17
Feb
10

Frankie in Wonderland

Frankie in Wonderland by A Tory.

Published by E. P. Dutton & Co., 1934.

Soft back pamphlet with no illustrations.

“With apologies to Lewis Carroll, the originator and pre-historian of the New Deal”.

An attack on the ‘New Deal’ as an Alice parody, with Franklin D Roosevelt as our Alice: the New Deal being his economic policies from 1933 to 1937.

Dedicated:

“To the American Eagle, that noble bird, before it was painted blue and turned into a Soviet Duck”.

Sometimes available on amazon: Frankie in Wonderland: With Apologies to Lewis Carroll, the Originator and Pre-Historian of the New Deal

24
Jan
10

clara in blunderland

Clara in Blunderland by Caroline Lewis. Published by William Heinemann, 1902.

Fifth and seventh impressions. Cloth hardback, 12mo.

I have two copies of this, and have managed to read neither. I know it was written by Harold Begbie and J. Stafford Ransome (together under the pseudonym of Caroline Lewis) as a satire on British involvement in the Boer war, especially at the failure of the government to resolve the conflict, but as I know very little about the war, the parody passes way over my head.

The illustrations are credited to S.R., and I believe they were the work of the J. Stafford Ransome part of the partnership. They echo the Tenniels, but look like political caricatures: again, my lack of historical knowledge lets me down: I don’t know who they are. Any suggestions welcome- might Clara be Balfour??

There is a sequel: Lost in Blunderland, which I don’t own. Yet…

Available on amazon: Clara In Blunderland




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 631 other followers

September 2014
M T W T F S S
« Jul    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  
{lang: 'en-GB'}

Flickr Photos

Gaj and the giant cocktail #cocktail

Eunice leaning.

Photo

#vanda

More Photos
Powered by WebRing.
This site is a member of WebRing.
To browse visit Here.
free counters

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 631 other followers

%d bloggers like this: