Posts Tagged ‘parody

13
Aug
12

Alice Through the Paper-mill

Alice Through the Paper-mill: In Respectful Criticism of the Paper Control and Kindred Matters relating to the Present State of the Trade. A Plea for an Equitable System of Planning whereby to ensure a measure of Efficiency and a Degree of order for all Concerned. By Arthur Wragg.

Printed by C. H. Foyle of Boxfoldia, 1940 for private circulation. Hardback, second edition. No dustjacket

12 full-page b/w drawings by the author.

A satire on war-time paper control regulations.

I love the illustrations, especially Alice enjoying a crafty fag.

Available on abebooks.
On Amazon: Alice Through The Paper-Mill,

06
Jul
11

The Westminster Alice

The Westminster Alice by Hector H. Monro (“Saki”).

Illustrated by F. Carruthers Gould.

Published by The Westminster Gazette, London, 1902.

Pamphlet with lots of black & white illustrations using Tenniel’s as inspiration, plus four pages of ads at the end of the book: they’re rather fun- Jaeger, Turkish Towels and Pianolas.

Prefaced:

With apologies to Sir John Tenniel and to everybody else concerned, including Messrs. Macmillan and Co., Limited to whose courtesy we are indebted for permission to publish these political applications of the immortal adventures of Lewis Carroll’s Alice.

A collection of 11 pieces satirising parliament and the political events of 1900-1902, when the initial enthusiasm of the public for the Boer War was fading fast and questions were being asked about the government’s  handling of the conflict.

Dwindle, dwindle little war,

How I wonder more and more,

As about the veldt you hop

When you really mean to stop.

The first piece appeared in the Westminster Gazette on 15 July 1900 and the series continued until early 1902. The series proved so popular that the parts were issued together in this pamphlet.

I think mine came from abebooks, but it might have been picked up in Marchpane Books in Cecil Court.

15
Jun
11

Alice’s Adventures in Jurisprudencia

Alice’s Adventures in Jurisprudencia by Peter F. Sloss.

Illustrated by Sally Richardson in nice imitation of Tenniel’s style.

Published by Borogrove Press 1982, softback, signed by author.

ISBN: 096082460X

In the book, a modern-day, grown up Alice, is unwinding after a long day at her lawyer’s office when she falls asleep in front of the television, and finds herself in Jurisprudencia, a  wonderland type world filled with some old friends, plus not a few pedantic lawyers. Sloss is an attorney, so I suspect he knows whereof he speaks…

He apparently got the idea after hearing a judge say:

“If words had absolute and constant referents, it might be possible to discover contractual intention in the words themselves and in the manner in which they were arranged. Words, however, do not have absolute and constant referents.”

This reminded him of Humpty’s pronouncement that…

When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said, ‘it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.’ ‘The question is,’ said Alice, ‘whether you can make words mean so many different things.’ ‘The question is,’ said Humpty Dumpty, ‘which is to be master—that’s all.’

There’s an appendix containing cited cases at the back, too…

Amazon: Alice’s adventures in Jurisprudencia

12
Jun
11

alice in thunderland

Alice in Thunderland: A Feminist Fairytale by Maeve Kelly. Published 1993 by Attic. ?First edition paperback? ISBN: 1-85594-081-7

Cover illustration by Trina Mahon.

Alice (a native of Harmony land) travels through Thunderland, run by the memblies. They rule over the femblies, who don’t ask questions, and believe that too much thinking makes your brain turn to feathers…

My copy has a biro dedication on first page, and also a bookcrossing label inside as it was a gift from a bookcrossing friend. Thanks, Esther!

I do love the front cover with the Alice in DMs. Good choice for tromping about in an alternative world, I reckon.

Available on amazon: Alice in Thunderland (Fairytales for Feminists)

05
Jun
11

Alice in Plunderland

Alice in Plunderland by Bernard Benson.

Subtitled:

A Down to Earth Book for Politicians and Economists… and Especially Their “Clients”. That is All of Us…

Published by The Minstrel Publishing Company 1978. Hardback with dustjacket.

Signed and numbered 1,475 of 5,000.

According to the cover notes, the book:

spreads out before our eyes a lucid picture of the world which we and our leaders between us have created.

..but I can’t possibly comment as I haven’t managed to wade through it. It’s all done in 4 colour cartoons with handwritten text, and seems to be ‘Alice does politics’. I haven’t even managed to read enough to decide what sort of politics it is.

Bought via abebooks, where all the current copies seem to be in Germany. You might be lucky and find on on amazon: Alice in Plunderland

23
May
11

All Us Through the Magnifying Glass

All Us Through the Magnifying Glass by B. Leslie Barker.

Tenniel illustrations.

Published in 1955, W. Ruddock & Sons Ltd.

This is a pre-publication copy as far as I can make out: there’s a note inside the front cover that says

‘Leslie from Leslie. not for publication until the executive permit 20.12.54′

Rather than a book, this is a pamphlet written as a tribute to the Philatelic Congress of Great Britain.

There’s even one of my favourite things- a Jabberwocky parody:

‘Twas Congress, and the quarter perfs
Did gyre and gimble on the gauge:
All braisil were the oeil de boeufs,
And bomba heads outrage

Alice’s name has been changed to Aniline, but several of the other characters are there. A fun little thing.

16
May
11

Alec’s Adventures in Railwayland

Alec’s adventures in Railwayland by L. T. C. Rolt Published 1964 by Ian Allan (London).

Lionel Thomas Caswall Rolt (1910–1974) was the biographer of Isambard Kingdom Brunel and Thomas Telford. He was an enthusiast for both vintage cars and heritage railways.

This is a satirical look at Dr. Beeching’s reforms written as an Alice sequel.  A very sweet little pamphlet of a book, with illustrations by Margaret Calvert.

New characters include:

  • Alec- the adventurer
  • The Mad Porter
  • The Dip Tech
  • The Pro
  • The Graphon
  • The Icy King
  • Familiar characters include the Tweedles and the Dormouse.

    46 pages, softback, stapled.
    Sometimes available on amazon: Alec’s adventures in Railwayland

    02
    May
    11

    Alice in Silverland

    Alice in Silverland: The Story and Trial of Alice, by Anne Lane.

    Illustrations by Louis Farrar.

    Published in 1939 by the International Silver Co, Meriden, Connecticut.

    Softback- more of a pamphlet than a book. I think it’s an advertising thing, but I can’t find any info on-line. Any comments welcome!

    Alice is put on trial for not using her cutlery correctly. She really does get into some strange situations, that Alice.

    Characters include Danny Dinner Knife, Tiny Tea Spoon and Judge Carving Knife.

    The drawings are charming little sketchy things, and Alice looks very young- pre Wonderland even…

    Bought on abebooks.

    28
    Mar
    11

    Alitji in the Dreamtime

    Alitji in the Dreamtime: a re-telling of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland story by Nancy Sheppard using Australian Aborigine language and imagery: the white rabbit has become a kangaroo and the dormouse is now a koala.

    The story is told in the Pitjantjatjara language of Central Australia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pitjantjatjara) and is back-translated into English alongside.

    The illustrations by Byron Sewell are rather beautifully printed in brown ink: far more elegant than black, especially on the grey-brown of the paper.

    Published in 1975 by the University of Adelaide, and available from various sellers on Amazon: Alitji on Amazon

    More equivalences:

    • the fan becomes a woomera
    • the caterpillar becomes a witchety grub
    • the Duchess becomes the Spirit of the North Wind
    • the Mad Hatter and the March Hare become a Stockman and a Horse
    • Croquet is played with storks and echindnas

    I think this is one of my favourite alternative Alice stories: the tale is well told, the rhymes and verses stand up well and the illustrations are beautiful. It works well as a book on its own merits, and it adds dimensions to the original story. Recommended.

    02
    Jan
    11

    Alice in the Delighted States

    Alice in the Delighted States by Edward Hope.

    Illustrated by Rea Irvin, who was the first art editor of the New Yorker.

    Published by The Dial Press, Lincoln Mac Veagh, 1928. Hardback, no dust jacket.

    Written as a parody of social and political foibles: Alice arrives in the Delighted States, via the stem of a drinking glass. She meets Rotarians, to whom she refuses to make a speech- the Rotarian next to commenting “That comes from being too subjunctive and makes the situation tense.”

    She meets Twaddle-dum and Twiddle-dee, one labeled H. L. M.  and the other, G. J. N. A slip of paper in my copy reveals that these two are Henry L. Mencken (American journalist, essayist and critic) and George Jean Nathan (an American critic).

    Later Alice begins to grow, and becomes much too large for her clothes- causing a case of Indecent Exposure. She goes to court where the lawyers of the Persecution and Pretense call ‘witlesses’ and select a jury full of frightened white rabbits, parrots, and a sleepy possum. The judge is wrapped up in red tape. A ‘very cross examination’ is interrupted by news: PRIZE BEAUTY SLAYS LOVE MATE WITH ICE PICK AFTER JAZZ PARTY IN RICH NEST, and Alice’s trial is over- Alice is advised to go into vaudeville, or write her Life Story. She ends up in Washington with elephants, donkeys and Uncle Sam, and then awakes in her father’s chair.

    Edward Hope wrote for the New York Herald Tribune.

    Bought on abebooks.

    Sometimes available on amazon: Delighted States




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