Posts Tagged ‘lewis carroll

08
Jul
14

Wonderland No More

TAG30017_thumbWonderland No More by Kevin L. Anderson, Lansing D. Tryon and Jordan Peacock.

Softback, with B&W text & colour cover. Published by Triple Ace Games.

Publisher’s details:

WE’RE ALL MAD HERE!

In 1865, Lewis Carroll introduced the world to the delightful nonsense of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, and followed up with Through the Looking Glass, and What Alice Found There in 1871. These tales present us with a world of whimsy and absurdity, and maybe just the tiniest hint of danger and adventure.

But what if there really was an Alice who visited Wonderland and what if it didn’t vanish as soon as she left? What if Wonderland’s childlike charm tarnished just a bit with the years, and it warped under the weight of its own nonsense? Maybe it’s all just a dream—or a nightmare—but it’s all very real for anyone trapped within.

Wonderland No More provides a setting for adventures within a realm of fantasy and the unexpected, a madcap ride that bounces between humor and horror. Here, when the Queen of Hearts cries, “Off with their heads!” it usually happens!

Take on the roles of wooden Chessmen, two-dimensional Cards, talking Animals, mobile Plants, Tweedle, or even the occasional Human. Knights quest for blessed artifacts of Alice, Little Girls master the deadly Queen’s Croquet, Haberdashers have a few tricks under their caps, and Gourmancers create magical foods and drinks (helpfully labeled “Eat Me” or “Drink Me” for those who can’t figure it out on their own).

Lighthearted or sinister, it’s all what you make of it in Wonderland—because we’re all mad here.

Contained in this book:Six playable races, including Animals, Cards and Chessmen.

* Over 40 new Edges and Hindrances explore the new character options the world of Wondrland.
* Three Arcane Backrounds – holy priests who worship Alice or the Spirit of Conflict, Gourmancers who cook their powers into dishes and Haberdashers wielders of hat themed magics.
* Detailed setting rules covering the science of Wonderland, its relation to our world, and more.
* A fully detailed campaign.
* Over twenty Savage Tales.
* Side Quests and Other Diversions – suggestions for further adventures along various themes.
* Full stats for dozens of allies, opponents and creatures the heroes will encounter on their journies.

Triple Ace Games presents Wonderland No More for the award winning Savage Worlds RPG – adventure in Alice’s world!

Some of the character types:

Bounty Hunter: Since the Queen of Hearts began taxing her subjects, jobs abound for those who want to hunt their kin for
money. Tax evaders disappear or become outlaws, and need to be tracked down.
Common Folk: “From small acorns mighty oaks grow,” so says an old proverb, and it is nowhere truer than with the common folk of Wonderland. By circumstance or happenstance, many a common villager has been thrust upon the path of adventure.
Explorer: These folk are no longer content to stay in their known and safe area, following the urge to wander and see what is over the horizon.
Guard: There is always a use for a guard, including warding the royal presence, ensuring that a tax collector remains unmolested, or fighting a
war with a rival.
Gourmancer: A few of those who study the culinary art of preparing magical dishes choose to travel the realms to sell their recipes to those who have immediate use for them, to cure an ill or right a wrong. These wandering Gourmancers often stumble into adventure whether they seek it out or not.
Haberdasher: Sometimes people ask for the strangest things on their hats! Whilst seeking the perfect jubjub feather, other adventures may intervene.

See more here.

Sometimes pops up on Amazon. Mine was a birthday present- Thanks Roz & Simon!

 

06
Jul
14

The Wonderland Postage-Stamp Case

Picture 14The Wonderland Postage-Stamp Case Along with Eight or Nine Wise Words About Letter-Writing by Lewis Carroll.

Modern French facsimile edition of the original, which was published by Emberlin and Son in 1890 and was sold in a printed envelope, together with a pamphlet written by Carroll.

I wish I could afford an original

From the pamphlet (although mine is in French):

Some American writer has said “the snakes in this district may be divided into one species—the venomous.” The same principle applies here. Postage-Stamp-Cases may be divided into one species, the “Wonderland.” Imitations of it will soon appear, no doubt: but they cannot include the two Pictorial Surprises, which are copyright.

You don’t see why I call them ‘Surprises’? Well, take the Case in your left-hand, and regard it attentively. You see Alice nursing the Duchess’s Baby? (An entirely new combination, by the way: it doesn’t occur in the book.) Now, with your right thumb and forefinger, lay hold of the little book, and suddenly pull it out. The Baby has turned into a Pig! If that doesn’t surprise you, why, I suppose you wouldn’t be surprised if your own Mother-in-law suddenly turned into a Gyroscope!

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Inside there are sections for different value stamps of the time, with an extra slot for the most commonly used onepenny stamp..

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Occasionally available on Amazon.

22
Jun
13

Illustrated by Franciszka Themerson

IMG_0406Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There: by Lewis Carroll, illustrated by Franciszka Themerson.

Published by Inky Parrot Press (2001).

Hard back with black boards decorated with white illustrations by Themerson.

With a forward by Jasia Reichardt, and afterword by (the now rather disgraced- found guilty of six charges of indecency with a child and one charge of indecent assault against a child) Graham Ovenden.

Themerson was commissioned in 1946 (not long before copyright was up) by Harrap to illustrate Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There. Even though the blocks had been made, Harrap decided not to go ahead with publication- possibly as with the loss of copyright, the market may have been flooded with new versions, but Inky Parrot rescued and published the rather fabulous illustrations in 2001.

Published in an edition of 372 Standard copies, casebound, signed and 48 Special copies, bound in quarter leather with 6 initialled prints in a folder, but mine is a proof copy with a dedication from  Ovenden.

IMG_0408

Available on Amazon.

31
Dec
11

Illustrated by Moritz Kennel

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll.

Illustrated by Moritz Kennel.

ISBN: 0690009844

Published by Crowell, New York, 1971. First US edition, and first in English. Hardback with dustjacket.

Kennel uses vibrant colours and strong shapes in the illustrations, giving them a real 70s look. Love ‘em. Shame I seem to be unable to find out anything about him…

 

31
Dec
11

The Philosopher’s Alice

The Philosopher’s Alice: Lewis Carroll with notes and introduction by Peter Heath. Subtitled The Thinking Man’s Guide to a Misunderstood Nursery Classic.

Tenniel illustrations

Published by Academy Editions, London, 1974. Hardcover. First Edition.

Peter Heath was a former president of the Lewis Carroll Society of North America, and Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the University of Virginia. The book is the original text (both books) with philosophical asides and comments: Heath himself says that the books show “surprising insights into abstract questions of philosophy”. Very interesting stuff: well worth a read.

On the “Raven/ Writing Desk’ riddle:

‘Shibles compares this to the unanswerable questions allegedly asked by Philosophers. But the real objection to it is that it has too many answers, namely all the innumerable negative properties that ravens share with writing desks (by which I suppose he means logical negatives like ‘neither of them have a chimney’). If these do not count then neither does the property of unanswerability which the Hatter’s riddle is supposed to share with the questions of Philosophers.’

On amazon: The Philosopher’s Alice: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass

28
Dec
11

Through the Looking-glass and What Alice Found There: Illustrated by John Vernon Lord

Through the Looking-glass and What Alice Found There: Illustrated by John Vernon Lord. Textual corrections and a foreword by Selwyn Goodacre.

Published by Artists Choice Editions; first edition (25 Oct 2011).

Available in two editions: a standard limited edition, with a run of 320 copies numbered and signed by Lord, and priced £98. The special limited edition, a run of 98 copies, bound with a leather spine and presented in a slipcase with a set of prints signed by Lord, is priced £320. Mine is the ‘cheap’ version…

From a Guardian article in 2007:

At first sight, his black and white illustrations, particularly those for Edward Lear, Lewis Carroll and Aesop, appear to be traditional wood engravings, but in fact they are all pen and ink drawings, which is something of a paradox. Wood engraving was invented so that drawings could be reproduced, but Lord has reversed the process and, instead of cutting into a surface to release the light, he skilfully builds up the dark areas with pen and ink. In his characteristically idiosyncratic manner, he meticulously records the time each illustration takes: in Aesop’s Fables, for instance, “The Bat, the Bramble and the Cormorant” took 16 hours, 32 minutes, while “The Crow and the Sheep” took 11 hours, 11 minutes. The variety in the textures (he uses a mapping pen and a Rotring) is astonishing: fine crosshatching emphasises form and volume, rather as a sheer black stocking does on a shapely ankle. Sometimes, with a thicker line, the glistening striations resemble the grooves on an old 78 record. In contrast to the free-hand drawing, certain areas are painstakingly created with parallel lines done with a ruler that’s had its hard edges rubbed down, so as to soften the line, while here and there he waxes the paper to resist the ink, creating sudden explosions of light in his atmospheric landscapes. His pen strokes are often dizzying in their intensity and while there’s little movement in the drawings – even the mad prancing figures he draws for Lear’s Nonsense Rhymes seem frozen in mid-air – around them the lines resonate with one another like singing telegraph wires. The composition is always precise and the drawing is very controlled, though occasionally he lets rip with a squiggle or two, as in “The Crow and the Sheep”. Humour is ever-present, but it’s a dark humour that lurks in corners and behind doors.

Just as lovely as the Wonderland.

Available via Amazon: Through the Looking-glass and What Alice Found There: Illustrated by John Vernon Lord

01
Nov
11

Illustrated by Jill Thompson and Jenny Frison

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll.

Illustrated by Jill Thompson and Jenny Frison.

Published by IDW Publishing, 2010. Hardback, ?1st edition?

Both Alice books in a single volume, with internal illustrations by Jenny Frison, and front cover art by Jill Thompson.

ISBN-13: 978-1600105968

From her bio:

Jill Thompson is the most well-known, female comicbook artist working in the comics industry today. She graduated in 1987 from the American Academy of Art in Chicago and has been working non-stop as a cartoonist and illustrator ever since. She has risen to the top of the male-dominated field and has garnered acclaim for her work on WONDER WOMAN, SWAMP THING, BLACK ORCHID and the award winning title SANDMAN with Neil Gaiman.

Jenny Frison is best known as a cover artist- they seem to have switched roles for this one. She has done covers for Angel and Spike comics. You can buy the artwork from this Alice (or just have a look) here.

I do prefer the internal illustrations to the cover art- they’re softer and less sharply cartoony. I didn’t buy this when I first saw it on Amazon, as I wasn’t attracted by the cover. It wasn’t until I found it in Dave’s Comics in Brighton that I got a look inside and bought it.

Still available on Amazon: Alices Adventures in Wonderland

24
Jul
11

Illustrated by Harry Rountree

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll: illustrated by Harry Rountree.

Published by Collins, date not known, but I think 1925. Small hardback book, no dustjacket.

Harry Rountree  came to London from New Zealand in 1901. He was 23 years old when he arrived, and he initially struggled. However, by the time he illustrated Alice (in 1908) he was a success. He re-visited Alice in 1925.

I bought this for a fiver as I like the Jabberwock who looks like a rabid guinea pig…

12
Jun
11

Aliciae Per Speculum Transitus

Aliciae Per Speculum Transitus (Quaeque Ibi Invenit), by Ludovici Carroll (Lewis Carroll).

Librum picturis ornavit Sir John Tenniel.

Translated by Clive Harcourt Carruthers.

Published by Macmillan, 1966 (same year as me). Hardback first edition with dustjacket.

I also own a latin Alice in Wonderland from the same translator: both of them are nice quality books, pleasant to hold and flick through, and it’s interesting trying to work out bits of the language (I did two years of Latin at school back in the 1980s, so don’t remember much…)

Available on Amazon: Aliciae per speculum transitus

29
May
11

Under the Quizzing Glass: A Lewis Carroll Miscellany

Under the Quizzing Glass: A Lewis Carroll Miscellany edited by R.B. Shaberman and Denis Crutch.

Published by The Magpie Press, 1972. Paperback.

The credit page says “Limited to 400 numbered copies (Nos. 1-25 being specially bound) of which this is No.”, and then there’s not a number but a hand drawn dash. What does that mean?

According to the frontispiece:

…containing original studies of his life and work together with some scarce Carrolliana now first reprinted and a poem never before published.

The best bit from my point of view is the “First Draft of an Annotated Handlist of Continuations and Imitations of Alice”.  I have a fair few of them already, but it gives me plenty more to track down!

Shaberman has written other books on Carroll, and apparently also on Nostradamus. Denis Crutch has written for the Lewis Carroll Society.

Bought on Amazon: Under the Quizzing Glass: Lewis Carroll Miscellany




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