Posts Tagged ‘Guinness

06
Jan
13

Alice Versary

Alice Versary: 1759-1959- The Guinness Birthday Book

Pamphlet of 16 pages, celebrating the 200th anniversary of Guinness.

Illustrations by Ronald Ferns

Printed by W. S. Cowell Ltd, Ipswich.

Guinness began sending promotional booklets to doctors in 1933, breaking off during World War 2, and restarting again in 1950.
In all, 24 were made, of which five are based on the Alice books: this is the last of the five. All of the booklets were produced by the advertising agency SH Benson, who were also responsible for many of the iconic Guinness ads of the period.

Ronald Ferns (14 October 1925 – 2 December 1997) was an English illustrator, designer, cartoonist and surrealist painter in both oil and watercolour.  After training at St. Martins in London, his first major official commission was a vast mural for the 1951 Festival of Britain for the Milk Marketing Board. In the same year, he was also commissioned to create the scenic design for the premiere of Fate’s Revenge by the Ballet Rambert. He later produced children’s books including The Learned Hippopotamus (1986), Caterpillar Stew (1990) and Like It Or Not (1992.

Parodies include The Fish Ball and Curiouser and Curiouser:

‘It must, I fear,’ said Alice, ‘Be something that I ate – I’m opening like a telescope at an alarming rate! And yet I can’t help thinking how useful necks like these would be in any Wonderland where Guinness grows on trees’.


Seems to be the easiest to find of the Guinness Alices. Mine was on ebay- there are usually one or two on amazon: Alice Versary

28
Jan
12

Alice in Posterland

Alice in Posterland.

Guinness advert from 1954 magazine.

13
Apr
11

Alice Aforethought: Guinness Carrolls for 1938

Alice Aforethought: Guinness Carrolls for 1938

Pamphlet of 24 stapled pages.

Illustrated by Antony Groves-Raines.

Printed in Great Britain by John Waddington Limited, London

This series of pamphlets are called “Doctor’s Books” as they were sent to GPs’ surgeries to get them to encourage the drinking of Guinness for medical purposes: apparently very good for nursing mothers for example… how times change.

Guinness began printing these in 1933, carried on until World War 2 halted the practice, and started again in 1950. The booklets were then produced each year until 1966. They were produced by the advertising agency SH Benson, who made many of the iconic Guinness ads. There were 24 booklets produced, of which five were Alice spoofs. This is the third of those.

Parodies include Alice Through the Guinness Glass, The Three Little Sisters, Humpty Dumpty Re-Cited, Clubberwocky and The French have a Word For It :

“What’s the French for Guinness?”

“I’m afraid I don’t know that” said Alice.

“Why, ‘Guinness’ of course!” said the Queen.

“But that’s the same word,” objected Alice.

“Why shouldn’t it be” said the Queen. “Even if you must talk French, there’s nothing like a Guinness, except another Guinness.”

I bought my copy cheaply on ebay- you might be lucky, or there’s usually a copy on either abebooks or on amazon: Alice Aforethought : Guinness Carrolls for 1938

13
Apr
11

Alice Where Art Thou? More Guinness Carrolling

Alice, Where Art Thou? (More Guinness Carrolling).

Pamphlet with 16 stapled pages.

1952: Printed by John Waddington Ltd., Leeds, England, on John Dickinson & Co. Ltd. Evensyde Paper

Illustrations by Antony Groves-Raines, who was also involved in designing posters for the Underground.

Guinness began sending promotional booklets to doctors in 1933, breaking off during World War 2, and restarting again in 1950.
In all, 24 were made, of which five are based on the Alice books: this is the fourth of the five. All of the booklets were produced by the advertising agency SH Benson, who were also responsible for many of the iconic Guinness ads of the period.

There are parodies of episodes from both Alice books, and from The Hunting of the Snark, along with Alice finding herself in new situations such as Alice in Snowmansland and Alice in Posterland.

My copy was bought fairly cheaply on ebay: you might be lucky and do the same, or you can usually find it for around the 80 quid mark on abebooks or amazon: Alice, where art thou?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

26
Apr
10

Jabberwocky Re-versed

Jabberwocky Re-versed (and other Guinness Versions) by Ronald Barton

Illustrated by John Gilroy

Published in 1935, and printed in Great Britain by John Waddington Limited, Leeds

24 page booklet, “Offered for your entertainment with the compliments of Arthur Guinness, Son and Co., Ltd.”

This series of pamphlets are called “Doctor’s Books” as they were sent to GPs’ surgeries to encourage the drinking of Guinness for medical purposes: very good for nursing mothers for example!

Guinness began doing this in 1933, carried on until World War 2 halted the practice, and they only started again in 1950. The booklets were then produced each year until 1966. They were produced by the advertising agency SH Benson, who made  many of the iconic Guinness ads. This was the second of the booklets that was based on Alice.

Twas grillig, and the City coves

Did scrum and scramble on the pave;

All grimsy were the shopper-droves

In the throat-parched heat-wave.

“Beware of Summer-flop, my son,

The head that aches, the limbs that flag!

Beware of Job-job boredom! Shun

The gloomious Plodder-flag!”

He took his fountain pen in hand;

Long time he toiled, acheiving naught-

Then rested he (and the Secra-tree)

And sat a while in thought

And as in puffish thought he sat,

The Summer-flop, observed by none,

Snalked in and would have knocked him flat-

But then the clock struck one!

Oh welcome chime! Tis Guinness time!

His thirsty lips went smicker-smack!

His langour fled, and clear in head

He went galumphing back.

“And hast thou vanquished Summer-flop?

My son, you know what’s good for you!

Oh glorjous draught!” He leapt, he laughed:

“Give me a Guinness, too!”

On Amazon: JABBERWOCKY RE-VERSED AND OTHER GUINNESS VERSIONS

09
Apr
10

The Guinness Alice

The Guinness Alice by Ronald Barton and Robert Bevan.

Pamphlet published by Guinness in 1933, and printed in Great Britain by John Waddington Ltd.

Illustrated by John Gilroy

I have the second edition with full colour illustrations: the first edition had both colour and line drawings.

This series of pamphlets are called “Doctor’s Books” as they were sent to GPs’ surgeries to encourage the drinking of Guinness for medical purposes: very good for nursing mothers for example!

Guinness began this in 1933, carried on until World War 2 halted the practice, and it only started again in 1950. The booklets were then produced each year until 1966. They were produced by the advertising agency SH Benson, who made  many of the iconic Guinness ads. This was the first of the 24 booklets, and the first of five based on Alice. I have all of them, so they’ll all make it onto here eventually…

This is graphically the simplest of the Guiness Alices, with spoof versions of several poems and scenes from the books.

Here’s Old Father William:

“You are old Father WIliiam”, the Young Man said,

“And yet you’re remarkably fit,

You sleep from the moment you get into bed,

Which is rare at your age, you’ll admit.”

“In my youth,” said the Sage, “I heard many reports

That Guiness brought rest to the brain,

Since when, if depressed or a bit out of sorts,

I’ve drunk it again and again.”

I might get round to scanning in some of the pages once I’m a bit more caught up with myself…

Available on amazon: The Guinness Alice
(I got mine cheap on ebay…)




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