Posts Tagged ‘alternative alices

23
Jun
11

Gladys in Grammarland and Alice in Grammarland

Gladys in Grammarland and Alice in Grammarland: Two Educational Tales Inspired by Lewis Carroll’s Wonderland by Audrey Mayhew Allen and Louise Franklin Bache.

Foreward by Michael Everson.

Illustrations for ‘Gladys’ by Charles Raymond Macauley, who was a newspaper cartoonist published in the New York Daily Mirror. ‘Alice’ is illustrated by Henry Clarence Pitz.

Published by Evertype in a new edition, 2010. Originally published 1897 and 1923 respectively.

I’d love to get copies of the original printings of these, but no luck so far. Good old Evertype though, providing readable copies of hard to find books.

You can read an excerpt and order a copy over on Evertype’s site.

09
Jun
11

Alice Redux

Alice Redux: New Stories of Alice, Lewis and Wonderland edited by Richard Peabody.

Published by Paycock Press, 2006. Softback first edition. Front cover painting by Julie Inman.

ISBN: 0931181224

Anthology of short stories, photos and excerpts from other Alice-themed books (some of which I own…)

From the back cover:

Beyond the Looking Glass with…

Donya Currie Arias, Beth Bachmann, Bruce Bauman, Jeffrey M. Bockman, Angela Carter, Robert Coover, Ann Downer, Kevin Downs, Rikki Ducornet, CMDupre, Alison Habens, Susan Hankla, Ann Harries, Dorothy Hickson, Alice Owens Johnson, Steven Millhauser, Miles David Moore, Dave Morice, Jeff Noon, Lance Olsen, Victoria Popdan, Doug Rice, Katie Roiphe, Lorraine Schein, Martin Seay, Aurelie Sheehan, Susan Sherman, David R. Slavitt, MaryAnn Suehle, Ross Taylor, Tom Whalen.

“Alice Redux is a potent and heady brew; conveying a surreal and intense array of atmospheres and phantasmagorical takes on the original tale, this is a collection by some of the finest and most imaginative writers around. Alice proves to be a Muse in hairband and pinafore; this collection of Alice in Wonderland inspired stories should most definitely be labelled Drink Me.” — Joolz Denby, author of Billie Morgan.

“Alice–the hippest girl in Victorian England, the first postmodern heroine–is back, reflected in the looking-glasses of some of the most imaginative writers of our day. Many of my favorites are here–Carter, Coover, Ducornet, Olsen, Sheehan–as well as some intriguing strangers. (And Nancy Taylor’s photographs had me fainting in coils.) The literary Alice exerts the same fascination on the contributors that Alice Liddell did on Lewis Carroll, liberating the imagination, loosening the tongue. This is a superb anthology, a Wonderland of fiction wild and new.” –Steven Moore, editor of Over the Rainbow? Hardly.

“Drawing their inspiration from the imaginative feast that is Alice in Wonderland, these stories are by turns funny, moving, and best of all, startling; each surprises in its own way, and each allows us to inhabit, for a little while longer, a world we didn’t even realize we missed.” – Carolyn Parkhurst, author of The Dogs of Babel.

This seems to be a love-it or hate-it anthology: the on-line reviews either praise it or pan it.

Available on Amazon: Alice Redux: New Stories of Alice, Lewis and Wonderland

06
Jun
11

Janice in Tomorrow-Land

Janice in Tomorrow-Land by Emory Holloway.

Published by American Book Company, 1936.

First Edition hardback, no dustjacket.

I’m not sure who the illustrations are by, but they’re wonderful- real 1930s style idea of the future. The first picture in the book includes a stained glass window with a depiction of Alice and the White Rabbit. It’s through this window that she meets ‘Mr Merlin’, who takes her on a number of adventures…

Emory Holloway (1885 -1977) was best known for books and studies of Walt Whitman.

You can find this on Amazon: Janice in Tomorrow-Land, but it’s generally pretty scarce and certainly rather expensive.

I couldn’t resist scanning in several of the illustrations:

31
May
11

Ethel’s Adventures in the Doll Country

Ethel’s Adventures in the Doll Country by Clara Bradford.

Illustrated by T. Pym, with 6 colour plates and smaller black and white illustrations in text.

Published by John F.Shaw & Co (48 Paternoster Row), 1880.

Hardback, no dustjacket. Red embossed boards with gilding.

Listed in Alternative Alices: Visions and Revisions of Lewis Carroll’s ‘Alice’ Books
as an Alice imitation.

Ethel loses her favourite doll, and on going to bed sees her toys running off to the Doll Country. Of course, she follows them…

This book seems to come in a variety of colours: my red, but I’ve also seen blue and green versions on-line.

I’m not sure if that’s related to date- my copy seems to be undated.

T. Pym is apparently the pseudonym of 19th-century children’s illustrator Clara Creed. She has also illustrated The Snow Queen.

I can’t find out anything about the author.

There’s a modern facsimile available on Amazon if you want to read the book: Ethel’s Adventures: In the Doll Country (Facsimile)
..or you can try and find an original: Ethel’s Adventures In The Doll Country

 

23
May
11

All Us Through the Magnifying Glass

All Us Through the Magnifying Glass by B. Leslie Barker.

Tenniel illustrations.

Published in 1955, W. Ruddock & Sons Ltd.

This is a pre-publication copy as far as I can make out: there’s a note inside the front cover that says

‘Leslie from Leslie. not for publication until the executive permit 20.12.54′

Rather than a book, this is a pamphlet written as a tribute to the Philatelic Congress of Great Britain.

There’s even one of my favourite things- a Jabberwocky parody:

‘Twas Congress, and the quarter perfs
Did gyre and gimble on the gauge:
All braisil were the oeil de boeufs,
And bomba heads outrage

Alice’s name has been changed to Aniline, but several of the other characters are there. A fun little thing.

23
May
11

Alice by Whoopi Goldberg

Alice by Whoopi Goldberg.

Illustrated by John Rocco.

Published by Bantam, 1992, Hardback, first edition with dustjacket.

ISBN: 9780553089905

Very odd: Alice looks like an aging hooker…

From the dustjacket:

Listen up – you’re about to lose control on a topsy-turvy adventure with a girl named Alice, one very cool, semi-invisible rabbit, a card-playing misfit with some serious headgear, and the wickedest queen you’ve ever seen! “Wait just one minute,” you say, “I’ve heard this story before.” Baby, you’ve never heard it like this. This tale is told by Whoopi Goldberg, the most outrageous storyteller around. This isn’t Wonderland, it’s the big, bad city. And these characters aren’t like any you’ve ever met. You’re about to find out that this town is bursting with crazy surprises. See, Alice has won a mysterious prize worth big bucks that she’s sure will change her life forever. But first she’s got to claim it – in person. Take off with Alice down streets where bendy buildings wave over your head. Watch the kaleidoscope colors of graffiti fly by on the subway. Even stop off at a diner that shrinks up smaller than your lunchbox. Just don’t linger too long over that tiny hamburger (even if those loony twin waiters do crack you up) because there’s a snooty uptown queen who’s just itching to snatch the prize ticket away from Alice. Join some new friends in a dizzying race against time that’s sure to mess up your hairdo and remind you that wild and wonderful things can happen in worlds as nearby as your very own neighborhood.

Review from Michael Cart, formerly at Beverly Hills Public Library (that I tend to agree with):

Goldberg’s first literary effort is compromised in several important ways: first of all, as its title suggests, the book attempts to be an urban pastiche of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland . This would be okay if the device were integral to the plot or even to the spirit and tone of the book. Unfortunately, it is neither. A second problem is that its premise is tired and its resolution predictable: the eponymous hero, Alice, is a young African-American girl living in New Jersey (well, at least the text tells us she’s young; in the illustrations she looks as if she’s about 42) who wants to be rich. Why she wants this is unclear, since she lives in a “nice” single-family house on a “nice” suburban street. Nevertheless, she enters countless sweepstakes and, no surprise, one day she receives a notification that she is a “WINNER.” To collect her prize she must go to New York City. Gathering up her friends (a Mad Hatter look-alike named Robin and an invisible rabbit–borrowed from the play “Harvey”), off she goes to the Mean Streets. There she meets a greedy rich woman who tries to steal her winning ticket; and, of course, it turns out that the sweepstakes is a scam and, of course, Alice comes to realize that she is already rich–in friendship. This is not only tired but trite, especially since Alice doesn’t learn this lesson herself; instead a fortune-teller informs her. The biggest problem of all, however, is that this is not a book for children; it’s a commercial package, which, in its style and sensibility–especially as captured in Rocco’s stridently expressionistic illustrations–is designed to appeal to adults shopping in a retail store.

Available on Amazon: Alice

18
May
11

Alice in Welfareland

Alice in Welfareland by Christopher Gilmore.

Cover illustration by Alex Jackson.

Paperback published by Robin Books, 2007.

ISBN-10: 1904843328

ISBN-13: 978-1904843320

From the publisher/ author:

1984! Curious Alice, lost in a forest, falls down a rabbit-hole at Warren Row. Saved before Humpty Dumpty’s fall and an apparent nuclear accident Alice, to stretch herself, encourages many alarming adventures under ground.

Nothing is as it seems. Even though some of the quaint characters suggest the original Lewis Carroll, others sit within spitting (image) distance of well-known personages in the Blue Dome. With The Queen, Margaret Thatcher, Hitler and the Boss of Ofsted as Humpty Dumpty…!

State welfare shortcomings are parodied as are the hippy ideals of the Survivalists in their reclaimed nuclear bunkers. Alice is challenged by the sub-terrestrial squatters. Also by the psychic Humphrey, the plump computer buff for whom she falls. Together, they try to outwit the wicked Police Commissioner before he grabs the Vril Rod of Power held by King Kal of the Underworld, in Rainbow Mountain.

Breathless safaris in and out of time and space flourish as different forms of Alice are chased by giant eye-less Grossocks, battered by Pubes, mangled by an astral Alchemist, befriended by dwarfs in the Flying Flute, entombed in a shrinking Pyramid, the final battle raging around the helpless Alice.

Warfare finally confronts Welfare as the Scars V Saffs try to annihilate each other, augmented by earthquakes, radiation leaks and occult weapons. Will Alice and Humphrey make it? And before Alice, the amazing Time Traveler, meets her stam-m-ering little girl admirer, that tall storyteller on Oxford’s riverbank, Charles L. Dodgson…?

Further effervescent questions are explored in this exciting and funny new novel faction.

Christopher Gilmore’s website here.
Available on Amazon: Alice in Welfareland

26
Jan
10

Alternative Alices

Alternative Alices: Visions and Revisions of Lewis Carroll’s ‘Alice’ Books by Carolyn Sigler. Published by the University Press of Kentucky, 1997. Paperback 8vo.

ISBN: 0813109329

Amazon: Alternative Alices: Visions and Revisions of Lewis Carroll’s ‘Alice’ Books

A collection of twenty ‘responses’ to the Alice books between 1869 and 1930: the editor suggests that the numbers of Alice parodies declined after this, but my collection still seems to include plenty…

Anyway: from the publisher:

In the decades following the publication of Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, male and female writers on both sides of the Atlantic, radicals as well as conservatives, produced no fewer than 200 imitations, revisions, and parodies of Carroll’s fantasies for children. In this delightful anthology, Carolyn Sigler gathers twenty of the most interesting and original of these responses to the Alice books, many of them long out of print. Alternately satiric, enchanting, experimental, and subversive, these Alice-inspired works reveal how variously Carroll’s books were read, reinscribed, and resisted in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Anyone who has ever followed Alice down the rabbit hole will enjoy the adventures of her literary siblings in the wide Wonderland of the human imagination.

The book mentions, among others, E. Nesbit, Tom Hood, Anna M. Richards, E.F. Benson, Charles E. Carryl, Christina Rosetti, Frances Hodgson Burnett and Saki.

And I’m shocked after looking at this book some years after I bought it: I have now got a fair few of them. It was invaluable when I started collecting. It’s sometimes difficult to search for Alice spoofs/ parodies: some have neither ‘Alice’ nor ‘wonderland’ in the title. Not much help on Google…




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