Posts Tagged ‘alice

08
Jul
14

Malice in Wonderland: Alice the Assassin

Malice-in-Wonderland-1-Alice-the-Assassin.225x225-75Malice in Wonderland: Alice the Assassin by Lotus Rose.

Self published paperback, 2012.

The blurb:

It’s a lot easier to be ruthless when you’re heartless. . .
The truth is not what you were led to believe. Alice never left Wonderland. It wasn’t all “just a dream.”
It’s a nightmare. A nightmare she can’t escape, where formerly pleasant characters throw her unhappy unbirthday parties to torment her, while others like to make her cry so they can lick her tears.
But one day after years of this unpleasantness, she loses her heart. Literally. Well, technically someone steals it.
And she has to get it back. By any means necessary. And it’s a lot easier to be ruthless now that she’s heartless.
She will have her heart returned to her even if she has to kill all the citizens of Wonderland one by one…

You can get the Kindle edition for free!

 

29
Jun
14

Alice in Sussex

alice-in-sussexAlice in Sussex written and illustrated by Nicholas Mahler.

Published by Suhrkamp Verlag Gmbh (Mar 2013). Softback.

German graphic novel in which Alice chases the White Rabbit down his rabbit-hole in search of an illustrated edition of Austrian poet H. C. Artmann’s Frankenstein in Sussex.

From the publisher:

Alice is back in Wonderland. Here she meets the White Rabbit, who leads her down into his rabbit hole in search of an illustrated edition of H. C. Artmann’s Frankenstein in Sussex. Over the course of the novel Alice repeatedly runs into the Rabbit who quotes freely from other literary works by the likes of Herman Melville and E. M. Cioran.

Unlike in Carroll’s classic, this Alice is not in Wonderland but rather in a house deep beneath the ground. On subsequent floors she encounters the famous creations of Lewis Carroll: the Hookah-Smoking Caterpillar, the Cheshire Cat, the Mock Turtle, and many others. One after the other, these creatures address the terrors of childhood and youth. When Alice reaches the ground floor of the house she comes face to face with Frankenstein’s Monster, whereupon she awakes from her terrifying dream.

Available on Amazon.

nicoals-mahler-aus-alice-in-sussex-frei-nach-lewis-carol-und-hc-artmann

27
Apr
14

Alice’s Sister

sister  Alice’s Sister by Jessica Young.

  Published by Turning Point (an imprint of WordTech), 2013.

  Paperback.

  ISBN 978-1625490384

  A collection of poems focusing on the story of Alice’s older sister Mary, told through      several voices. There’s a full and positive review on the Lewis Carroll Society of North America’s website, and there’s an interview with the writer here.

From the blurb:

We have all imagined it–our daytime activities reappear, twisted, in our dreams at night. What, then, drove Alice to dream of bodily distortions and dangerous adults? What is happening in her waking life to cause this darkness? Reimagined using details from Carroll’s original work, Jessica Young’s collection ALICE’S SISTER focuses on Alice’s older sister, Mary, and the trouble she faces–the quiet, shadowy disturbances–that affects everyone around. It seems the rabbit hole goes much farther down than we thought. Employing ambitious writing techniques such as rotating narrators, Young invites us in for the descent.

Available on Amazon.

20
Jun
13

Peter and Alice

paPeter and Alice programme.

From the production at the Noel Coward theatre, May 2013.

Judi Dench plays Alice Liddell and Ben Whishaw Peter Llewelyn Davis (Peter Pan). The two meet behind the scenes in a bookshop: their encounter actually took place in 1932, when Alice was 80 and Peter 35.  The Skyfall writer John Logan has imagined what might have been discussed between them….

The fictional Alice and Peter also appear on stage with the two now adult models for the characters, and prod them into recollections joyful and painful.

Sets have lots of Alice touches. I wish I could have photographed them…

12
Jun
11

alice in thunderland

Alice in Thunderland: A Feminist Fairytale by Maeve Kelly. Published 1993 by Attic. ?First edition paperback? ISBN: 1-85594-081-7

Cover illustration by Trina Mahon.

Alice (a native of Harmony land) travels through Thunderland, run by the memblies. They rule over the femblies, who don’t ask questions, and believe that too much thinking makes your brain turn to feathers…

My copy has a biro dedication on first page, and also a bookcrossing label inside as it was a gift from a bookcrossing friend. Thanks, Esther!

I do love the front cover with the Alice in DMs. Good choice for tromping about in an alternative world, I reckon.

Available on amazon: Alice in Thunderland (Fairytales for Feminists)

06
Jun
11

Janice in Tomorrow-Land

Janice in Tomorrow-Land by Emory Holloway.

Published by American Book Company, 1936.

First Edition hardback, no dustjacket.

I’m not sure who the illustrations are by, but they’re wonderful- real 1930s style idea of the future. The first picture in the book includes a stained glass window with a depiction of Alice and the White Rabbit. It’s through this window that she meets ‘Mr Merlin’, who takes her on a number of adventures…

Emory Holloway (1885 -1977) was best known for books and studies of Walt Whitman.

You can find this on Amazon: Janice in Tomorrow-Land, but it’s generally pretty scarce and certainly rather expensive.

I couldn’t resist scanning in several of the illustrations:

23
May
11

Alice by Whoopi Goldberg

Alice by Whoopi Goldberg.

Illustrated by John Rocco.

Published by Bantam, 1992, Hardback, first edition with dustjacket.

ISBN: 9780553089905

Very odd: Alice looks like an aging hooker…

From the dustjacket:

Listen up – you’re about to lose control on a topsy-turvy adventure with a girl named Alice, one very cool, semi-invisible rabbit, a card-playing misfit with some serious headgear, and the wickedest queen you’ve ever seen! “Wait just one minute,” you say, “I’ve heard this story before.” Baby, you’ve never heard it like this. This tale is told by Whoopi Goldberg, the most outrageous storyteller around. This isn’t Wonderland, it’s the big, bad city. And these characters aren’t like any you’ve ever met. You’re about to find out that this town is bursting with crazy surprises. See, Alice has won a mysterious prize worth big bucks that she’s sure will change her life forever. But first she’s got to claim it – in person. Take off with Alice down streets where bendy buildings wave over your head. Watch the kaleidoscope colors of graffiti fly by on the subway. Even stop off at a diner that shrinks up smaller than your lunchbox. Just don’t linger too long over that tiny hamburger (even if those loony twin waiters do crack you up) because there’s a snooty uptown queen who’s just itching to snatch the prize ticket away from Alice. Join some new friends in a dizzying race against time that’s sure to mess up your hairdo and remind you that wild and wonderful things can happen in worlds as nearby as your very own neighborhood.

Review from Michael Cart, formerly at Beverly Hills Public Library (that I tend to agree with):

Goldberg’s first literary effort is compromised in several important ways: first of all, as its title suggests, the book attempts to be an urban pastiche of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland . This would be okay if the device were integral to the plot or even to the spirit and tone of the book. Unfortunately, it is neither. A second problem is that its premise is tired and its resolution predictable: the eponymous hero, Alice, is a young African-American girl living in New Jersey (well, at least the text tells us she’s young; in the illustrations she looks as if she’s about 42) who wants to be rich. Why she wants this is unclear, since she lives in a “nice” single-family house on a “nice” suburban street. Nevertheless, she enters countless sweepstakes and, no surprise, one day she receives a notification that she is a “WINNER.” To collect her prize she must go to New York City. Gathering up her friends (a Mad Hatter look-alike named Robin and an invisible rabbit–borrowed from the play “Harvey”), off she goes to the Mean Streets. There she meets a greedy rich woman who tries to steal her winning ticket; and, of course, it turns out that the sweepstakes is a scam and, of course, Alice comes to realize that she is already rich–in friendship. This is not only tired but trite, especially since Alice doesn’t learn this lesson herself; instead a fortune-teller informs her. The biggest problem of all, however, is that this is not a book for children; it’s a commercial package, which, in its style and sensibility–especially as captured in Rocco’s stridently expressionistic illustrations–is designed to appeal to adults shopping in a retail store.

Available on Amazon: Alice




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 631 other followers

September 2014
M T W T F S S
« Jul    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  
{lang: 'en-GB'}

Flickr Photos

#rose #flower #fake #johnlewis

I love going through the 'suggested friends' bit on Facebook- especially when it links two people you know completely independently from each other in an 'x degrees of separation' sort of a way.

Mortality

#snail #pattern

More Photos
Powered by WebRing.
This site is a member of WebRing.
To browse visit Here.
free counters

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 631 other followers

%d bloggers like this: