Archive for the 'odds and sods' Category

06
Jul
14

The Wonderland Postage-Stamp Case

Picture 14The Wonderland Postage-Stamp Case Along with Eight or Nine Wise Words About Letter-Writing by Lewis Carroll.

Modern French facsimile edition of the original, which was published by Emberlin and Son in 1890 and was sold in a printed envelope, together with a pamphlet written by Carroll.

I wish I could afford an original

From the pamphlet (although mine is in French):

Some American writer has said “the snakes in this district may be divided into one species—the venomous.” The same principle applies here. Postage-Stamp-Cases may be divided into one species, the “Wonderland.” Imitations of it will soon appear, no doubt: but they cannot include the two Pictorial Surprises, which are copyright.

You don’t see why I call them ‘Surprises’? Well, take the Case in your left-hand, and regard it attentively. You see Alice nursing the Duchess’s Baby? (An entirely new combination, by the way: it doesn’t occur in the book.) Now, with your right thumb and forefinger, lay hold of the little book, and suddenly pull it out. The Baby has turned into a Pig! If that doesn’t surprise you, why, I suppose you wouldn’t be surprised if your own Mother-in-law suddenly turned into a Gyroscope!

0384-ob1995_416_3

Inside there are sections for different value stamps of the time, with an extra slot for the most commonly used onepenny stamp..

0384-ob1995_416_2

 

Occasionally available on Amazon.

05
Jul
14

First Day Cover 1994

1994_Greet_PO_sloganFirst Day Cover 1994.

Mad Hatter First Day Cover. There were others: yet to be tracked down…

According to the BFDC website:

First day covers are specially designed envelopes with attractive postage stamps which have been postmarked on the day the stamps were issued by the Post Office.

 

Stamps:
Dan Dare and the Mekon
Three Bears
Rupert the Bear
Alice
Noggin the Nog
Peter Rabbit
Red Riding Hood and the Big Bad Wolf
Orlando the Marmalade Cat
Biggles
Paddington Bear
This isn’t my actual envelope I’m afraid- my lack of scanner is impeding me. Mine has the stamps all level rather than split, and is postmarked Nottingham.
30
Sep
13

Royal Mail Stamps: “The Magical World of Children’s Literature”

scan0001Royal Mail Stamps: “The Magical World of Children’s Literature”, designed by Peter Malone.

Royal Mail, 1998. First day cover.

This series of stamps illustrating classic children’s literature marked the centenaries both of the death of Lewis Carroll and the birth of C. S. Lewis.

The 20p stamp shows Bilbo Baggins and Smaug from The Hobbit; the 26p one depicts Mr. Tumnus, Lucy, and Aslan from The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe; 37p is the children from E. Nesbit’s The Phoenix and the Carpet and 43p has Pod and Arrietty from The Borrowers. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland  is naturally the subject of the most expensive 63p stamp, with  Alice and the Red Queen running as fast as they can to stay where they are.

Just at this moment, somehow or other, they began to run.

Alice never could quite make out, in thinking it over afterwards, how it was that they began: all she remembers is, that they were running hand in hand, and the Queen went so fast that it was all she could do to keep up with her: and still the Queen kept crying ‘Faster! Faster!’ but Alice felt she could not go faster, though she had not breath left to say so.

The most curious part of the thing was, that the trees and the other things round them never changed their places at all: however fast they went, they never seemed to pass anything. ‘I wonder if all the things move along with us?’ thought poor puzzled Alice. And the Queen seemed to guess her thoughts, for she cried, ‘Faster! Don’t try to talk!’

Not that Alice had any idea of doing that. She felt as if she would never be able to talk again, she was getting so much out of breath: and still the Queen cried ‘Faster! Faster!’ and dragged her along. ‘Are we nearly there?’ Alice managed to pant out at last.

‘Nearly there!’ the Queen repeated. ‘Why, we passed it ten minutes ago! Faster!’ And they ran on for a time in silence, with the wind whistling in Alice’s ears, and almost blowing her hair off her head, she fancied.

‘Now! Now!’ cried the Queen. ‘Faster! Faster!’ And they went so fast that at last they seemed to skim through the air, hardly touching the ground with their feet, till suddenly, just as Alice was getting quite exhausted, they stopped, and she found herself sitting on the ground, breathless and giddy.

The Queen propped her up against a tree, and said kindly, ‘You may rest a little now.’

Alice looked round her in great surprise. ‘Why, I do believe we’ve been under this tree the whole time! Everything’s just as it was!’

‘Of course it is,’ said the Queen, ‘what would you have it?’

‘Well, in our country,’ said Alice, still panting a little, ‘you’d generally get to somewhere else — if you ran very fast for a long time, as we’ve been doing.’

‘A slow sort of country!’ said the Queen. ‘Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that!’

Bought for the magnificent sum of 80p in an antique shop in Snape Maltings.

l_carrollkaart

 

 

09
Sep
13

Iris Theatre’s Alice in Wonderland Programme

2C057EF19-B119-20E5-70F8BD3802B33FD8Iris Theatre’s Alice in Wonderland Programme.

Theatre programme, published July 2012.

According to their website:

Iris Theatre was created in 2007 to produce a production of T.S. Eliot’s Murder in the Cathedral at the world famous St. Paul’s Church in Covent Garden, right in the heart of Central London. The success of that production led on to further shows, more success, and a dynamic company which has grown year on year. We gained full charity status in Oct 2009 with a mission to support the development of the next generation of professional theatre practitioners across all theatre forms.

They’re now resident at St. Paul’s, and it was in the grounds and body of the church that the action took place. The story was told with energy, imagination and enthusiasm by the small (and apart from Alice, male) cast, and the different sets were really delightful, as was the initial journey down the rabbit hole. Shame it’s finished, or I’d recommend you to go…

Fran about to go down the Rabbit Hole.

Fran about to go down the Rabbit Hole.

20
Jun
13

Peter and Alice

paPeter and Alice programme.

From the production at the Noel Coward theatre, May 2013.

Judi Dench plays Alice Liddell and Ben Whishaw Peter Llewelyn Davis (Peter Pan). The two meet behind the scenes in a bookshop: their encounter actually took place in 1932, when Alice was 80 and Peter 35.  The Skyfall writer John Logan has imagined what might have been discussed between them….

The fictional Alice and Peter also appear on stage with the two now adult models for the characters, and prod them into recollections joyful and painful.

Sets have lots of Alice touches. I wish I could have photographed them…

09
Jan
13

Cheshire Hat

catA cat hat.  A Cheshire cat hat. Not a grin without a cat, or a cat without a grin, but a case to put your head in.

A present from my generous ex-boyfriend…

Do you know how hard it is to scan a hat?

30
Dec
12

A Mad Tea-Party by Clifford Richards

tea-partyA Mad Tea-Party by Clifford Richards.

From the V&A Shop website:

A Mad Tea-Party – a celebration of British Design by Clifford Richards

Giclee print
Limited edition of 150, signed and numbered by the artist.

Created by Clifford Richards to celebrate British Design in the year 2012.  Look closely at the print to see a plethora of design classics and some familiar faces.  Now in his 70s, Clifford Richards left his advertising job in the mid 1960s to focus on creating his own products, invariably made from card and adorned with bold, colourful graphic illustration. Much of his work from the 60s and 70s is now in the V&A’s permanent collection.

The print is full of references to British design: from Gilbert and George to Dyson. It’s hard to see them all at small scale, but here’s the list if you want to have a go:

L-R: Grayson Perry and Measles, Peter Blake, David Hockney, Stephen Jones, Damien Hirst, Prof Tracey Emin wearing a dress loosely based on Vivienne Westwood’s designs, Gilbert and George, Heston Blumenthal pouring a rainbow, Terence Conran

The table leg is from the Louis Console Table by John Reeves for Heal’s. Peter Blake sits on Tom Dixon’s Offcut Stool. Stephen Jones on a Robin Day Polyprop Armchair, Terence Conran lounges in his own Cone Chair and in the foreground is Ron Arad’s Three Skin Chair.

Under the table Paul Smith is represented by his brands shopping bag and James Dyson by his Ball. There is a trash can that used to appear on old Mac computers.

On the table are a couple of Clifford Richards Urban Alphabet mugs. One showing an anglepoise lamp which was an original British design, a vase with Mary Quant’s flower and an iconic plastic squeeze Red Tomato.

At the back is bunting representing the Queen’s Jubilee, an E-Type Jaguar and Concorde.

Available from the V&A or on Amazon.




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